Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th International Conference on Clinical & Experimental Dermatology New Orleans, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Martin C. Mihm

Brigham & Women’s Hospital
USA

Keynote: Pathogenesis and comparison of atypical spitz nevi vs benign spitz, and childhood melanoma

Time : 10:05-10:35

OMICS International Dermatology-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Martin C. Mihm photo
Biography:

Martin C Mihm graduated “Summa cum laude” from Duquesne University in 1955. He obtained his medical degree from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in 1961. He specialized in Internal Medicine, Dermatology, Pathology, and Dermatopathology. He started residency in dermatology at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in 1964 and after completing pathology residency joined the staff in 1973. In 1976, he founded one of the first five residency training programs in Dermatopathology in the United States. He became a Professor at Harvard Medical School in 1980. He joined the faculty of Albany Medical Center in 1993 to establish a dermatology and dermatopathology training program. In 1996, he returned to MGH to continue work in melanoma and to establish a vascular malformation clinic as Clinical Professor. On July 1, 2010, he assumed the position as Director of the Melanoma Program in Dermatology at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Associate Director Dana-Farber and Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center. He holds now five adjunct professorships at different schools in the United States. He also was a co-founder of the Rare Tumor Institute of the WHO in Milan, Italy and acted as external coordinator for five years. He is currently co-director of the EORTC melanoma pathology program. He has written over four hundred articles and authored and co-authored twelve books. His research interests have principally been related to malignant melanoma, the study of delayed hypersensitivity reactions in animals and humans with Dr. Harold Dvorak, and more recently has begun to investigate the pathogenesis of vascular anomalies. He began his melanoma studies with Dr. Wallace Clark in 1965 and coauthored the first publication of the classification of malignant melanoma into subtypes.

Abstract:

This presentation will review the clinical and pathologic features of the Spitz group of lesions that cause both clinical and histopathological difficulties in diagnosis. The clinical features of each entity will be described, followed by the appropriate histopathologic criteria that will also be illustrated. The benign Spitz nevus will be compared to atypical Spitz nevi, and atypical Spitz’s tumors. Many of the latter lesions have the ability to metastasize but usually do not extend beyond regional lymph nodes. The criteria for the diagnosis of the atypical Spitz’s tumor will be presented in detail. The malignant counterpart of the Spitz nevus will also be described. The treatment of each entity will be presented. A recently described entity, considered by many a variant of the Spitz nevus, the so-called BAPoma, will also be shown in clinical and histopathologic detail. The mutation that results in this tumor will be discussed, as well as the heritable nature of patients affected by this trait. Finally, the second portion of the talk will review malignant melanoma of childhood, its incidence, clinical presentation, and histopathology. Emphasis will be placed on the lesions that have the capacity to cause death in children. These lesions will be compared to and contrasted with the Spitz nevus and its associated atypical counterparts. Treatment of childhood melanoma will also be detailed. Recent molecular techniques including Frozen In-Situ Hybridization (FISH) will also be reviewed.

Keynote Forum

Clay J Cockerell

Founder of Cockerell Dermatopathology
USA

Keynote: Cutaneous melanoma

Time : 10:35-11:05

OMICS International Dermatology-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Clay J Cockerell photo
Biography:

Clay J. Cockerell, MD is Clinical Professor of Dermatology and Pathology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and Director of the Division of Dermatopathology. He is the President and Owner of Cockerell Dermatopathology and the past Medical Director of Cockerell and Associates Dermatopathology as well as a diplomat of the American Academy of Dermatology and American Board of Dermatopathology. Dr. Cockerell is internationally recognized for his contributions to both dermatology and dermatopathology. He is the past president of the American Academy of Dermatology. For many years, Dr. Cockerell has overseen an educational program designed to train the next generation of dermatopathologists. He has served as Associate Editor of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology and is on the editorial boards of a number of medical journals including the American Journal of Dermatopathology.

Abstract:

This talk presents an overview and update of what’s new in the diagnosis and treatment of Melanoma. Topics include the epidemiology, primary prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of melanoma. Emphasis placed on clinicohistopathologic correlation and novel genetic testing that can guide diagnosis, prognosis and treatment

Break: Networking & Refreshments Break 11:05-11:25 @ Foyer
  • Track 1: Dermatological Diseases
    Track 2: Esthetic and Cosmetic Dermatology
Location: Ground Ball Room B
Speaker

Chair

Alwyn Rapose

Reliant Medical Group, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Nasim Fazel

University of California, Davis, USA

Session Introduction

Ajay K Banga

Mercer University
USA

Title: Microneedle and iontophoresis based products

Time : 11:25-11:45

Speaker
Biography:

Ajay K Banga is Professor and Department Chair in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Mercer University, Atlanta, GA. He also holds an Endowed Chair in transdermal delivery systems. He has a PhD in Pharmaceutics from Rutgers University, NJ. He has over 250 publications and scientific abstracts to his credit. He currently serves on the Editorial Board of 10 journals, as Associate Editor for one journal, and has served as the Editor-in-Chief for a Drug Delivery Journal. He has written three single author books and over 10 book chapters in the areas of transdermal delivery and protein formulation/delivery. He is a Fellow of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists.

Abstract:

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in active energy or minimally invasive technologies for cosmetic use and also to expand the scope of transdermal delivery to hydrophilic molecules and macromolecules. These molecules do not normally pass through the skin unless enabling technologies are used. Recent innovations in these technologies, especially for iontophoresis and microporation, will be presented. Microporation involves the creation of micron-sized micropores or microchannels in the skin which can then allow the transport of water soluble molecules. Skin microporation can be achieved by microneedles or by using thermal, laser, or radio-frequency ablation. Iontophoresis involves the application of small amounts of physiologically acceptable currents to drive ionic molecules into the skin. Technology behind products on the market such as Biobliss, Dermaroller, WrinkleMD and Zecuity will be discussed. The author has done significant research with both techniques in his laboratory with over 50 different drug molecules and cosmeceuticals.

Alwyn Rapose

Reliant Medical Group
USA

Title: Antibiotics for skin infections

Time : 11:45-12:05

Speaker
Biography:

Alwyn Rapose obtained his Doctorate in Dermatology/ Venereology / Leprology from King Edward VII Memorial Hospital, Bombay, India. Thereafter he obtained an MD in Internal Medicine from St. Vincent Hospital, Massachusetts, USA, followed by a Fellowship in Infectious Diseases at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA. He was a recipient of the NIH/NIAID supported UTMB postdoctoral research grant in Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases. In July 2014 he was elected fellow of the American College of Physicians. He is presently Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine at the University of Massachusetts, USA and practices as consultant in Infectious Diseases and Travel Medicine at the Reliant Medical Group and St. Vincent Hospital in Massachusetts, USA. Dr. Rapose is board certified in both Infectious Diseases and Internal Medicine.

Abstract:

Infections of the skin can be caused by bacteria, fungus, virus and rarely parasites. Bacterial skin infections can be mild - like impetigo and folliculitis, managed with topical medications, or severe – like abscess and necrotizing fasciitis requiring surgery, hospitalization and intravenous antibiotics. Over the last decade, there has been an increase in the number of severe bacterial skin infections - often associated with methicillin-resistant-staphylococcus-aureus (MRSA) - resulting in increased number of visits to emergency rooms. There is also a trend towards increasing hospital admissions for skin and skin-structure infections resulting in increased health-care costs. Host factors like diabetes, peripheral vascular disease as well as obesity contribute to the morbidity associated with these infections. Surgical site infections deserve special attention as the organisms associated with these are often acquired from the health-care environment. Early intervention with appropriate antibiotics results in improved outcomes. Deep wound cultures help target antibiotics to the organism identified. Outpatient intravenous antibiotic therapy (OPAT) has helped reduce duration of hospital stay. Vancomycin is considered the “gold-standard” for management of MRSA infection, but newer oral and intravenous antibiotics with improved safety profiles have expanded options for management of these infections.

Lorraine L. Rosamilia

Dermatologist, Geisinger Health System, State College, PA

Title: Herpes Zoster: Conundrums and controversies

Time : 12:25-12:45

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Rosamilia is a Staff Dermatologist with the Geisinger Health System, practicing in State College, PA. She received medical school and residency training in dermatology at the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, PA, and has particular interest in resident and primary care teaching and scientific journal editing. Her practice focus includes medical dermatology, namely psoriasis, acne, infectious disease, and skin malignancy.

Abstract:

Herpes zoster presents significant clinical and fiscal morbidity for patients and providers. From acute and chronic wound and pain conditions to vaccination strategies and infection control measures, its ramifications intertwine between many medical disciplines and governing bodies. A recent study of health care economic burden notes that herpes (including zoster) is one of the top 5 most costly categories of skin disease. Moreover, medical providers differ widely in their approaches to the management of herpes zoster. For instance, the literature wavers in its recommendations for prevention of post-herpetic neuralgia, yet a well-done recent study has shed light on the effectiveness of antiviral and gabapentin regimens. Also, vaccination strategies for herpes zoster are inconsistent. It is currently recommended in patients over 50, and very few surveys have evaluated patient compliance since its FDA approval. In current clinical settings, it is unclear who should be taking the lead (primary care vs. specialists) for its employment, despite its positive safety and efficacy profile. In addition, hospital isolation policies for patients and staff with or exposed to herpes zoster are often inconsistent, misunderstood, outdated, or poorly outlined in institutional handbooks. Furthermore, the difference in infectivity between native varicella and subsequent herpes zoster is often misinterpreted. A disease entity with such disparate management strategies should be clarified. By summarizing the pathogenesis of herpes zoster and the efficacy of its treatment and vaccination, in addition to outlining the best practices given recent literature, dermatologists, physician extenders, and other medical providers will be better able to determine the appropriate course of treatment, isolation measures, and education of zoster patients.

Dorothee Nashan

Klinikum Dortmund gGmbH
Germany

Title: Actinic keratoses - A west European view

Time : 12:45-13:05

Speaker
Biography:

Dorothée Nashan is Professor and Head of Department of Dermatology, Klinikum Dortmund, Germany. She is specialist in dermato-oncology focus on melanoma, cutaneous lymphoma and palliative care. Her education included scientific work in biochemistry and immunology in reproductive medicine (Max Planck Society, Harvard Medical School), clinical education in the Departments of Dermatology, University of Münster and Fribourg. Continously publishing papers and serving as an editorial board member of repute she is engaged in the promotion and education of young colleagues inter alia in connection with the German Society of Dermatology.

Abstract:

High incidences of actinic keratoses, the pathophysiologically proven and accepted transition of AK into SCC and the resulting unacceptable mortality rate unify world-wide medical efforts in improving early diagnoses and therapies of AKs. A spectrum of efficient therapeutic options is available. Guidelines and recommendations from across Europe - Germany, Great Britain, France, Italy, and Spain – underline interest in the assessment, acceptance and use of therapeutic options, but also reveal diverse attitudes towards these aspects. Efforts to combat AKs include primary and secondary prevention. The evaluation of treatment includes a consideration of effectiveness, sustainability and tolerability of procedures, as well as response rates. An incredible number of publications concerning catchphrases like actinic keratoses, therapy, studies, response rate and spinalioma development complicate a survey. Useful up-dates, critical reviews and recommendations are continuously published. The number and grades of AKs, the size of area treated, and in particular the duration of follow-up are different, often making comparisons unbalanced. Cochrane based data analyses and meta-analyses confirm those difficulties whilst offering a ranking of standard interventions. Shouldn't we ask for a more normative procedure concerning the goals of our studies? Where is the common denominator in requirements? Besides personal expertise and equipment, the individual decision for the treatment of AKs should be based on the best possible evidence. Algorithms and increasing demand of sequential therapies will profit. All countries agree on the necessity of early treatment, and on the focus on point and field treatment, with increasing interest in long-term success, including in cases of field cancerisation. Implementation in daily practice and further requirements shall be discussed.

Break: Lunch Break 13:05-13:50 @ Cafe LaSalle
Speaker
Biography:

Maurice Efana Asuquo, FWACS, FICS, University of Calabar/University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, (UCTH),Calabar, Nigeria. Served as the Head of Department of Surgery, University of Calabar, Dean, Faculty of Medicine, and Dentistry and currently Provost College of Medical Sciences. His major research interest is dermatological oncology. Head of the Oncology unit of UCTH, Calabar, Nigeria. Attended several International and Local conferences, presented several papers on dermatological oncology and member of Dermatology-2014/ 2015-Organising Committee. He pioneered research resulting in over 80 publications.

Abstract:

Cutaneous metastasis is valuable though with infrequent occurrence in clinical practice. It is of esteem value in diagnosis as well as treatment of cancer due to the ease of accessibility for clinical examination and biopsy. Method Patients who presented with histologic diagnosis of cutaneous metastatic malignancies at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, (UCTH), Calabar, Nigeria from 2010 to 2013 were studied and compared with total number of patient with cutaneous malignancies seen over the same period. Results Sixty histologically diagnosed cutaneous malignancies presented to UCTH, Calabar, [55(92%) patients with primary cutaneous malignancies while 5(8%) were metastatic cutaneous cancer]. The 5 patients comprised 2 men and 3 women with ages that ranged from 37- 75 years (mean 59.2 years). The site distribution was 3(75%) anterior abdominal wall [2- umbilicus, Figure 1a, 1- laparotomy scar], 1- Back – left scapular region and 1 – wide spread cutaneous lesions (from head to the foot), Figure 2a. Two (40%) patients presented with malignant intestinal obstruction, Table 1. The histology of the cutaneous lesions revealed, 4 (80%) patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma, Figure 1b, 3 from proven colonic sites, one suspicious and one with metastatic olfactory neuroblastoma, Figure 2b. The later was the patient with wide spread cutaneous lesions. These nodules remarkably occurred during chemotherapy and radiotherapy for the primary left eye lesion that appeared to be responding to therapy. The outcomes were uniformly poor due to advanced primary lesions at presentation. Conclusion Evaluation of skin provides valuable insights into underlying malignant process and often of diagnostic and prognostic value. Clinicians are urged to show interest in cutaneous nodules in view of the estimable value by subjecting such for histological evaluation.

Speaker
Biography:

Andreia Ascenso has completed her Ph.D in Pharmaceutical Technology from Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon with final grade summa cum laude. She is Professor of Pharmaceutical Technology since September 2005. She has published and reviewed more than 10 papers in International Journals with peer review. She has 8 oral communications in reputed conferences. She serves as an Editorial Board Member on Carrier-Mediated Dermal Delivery: Applications in the Prevention and Treatment of Skin Disorders Book, Pan Stanford Publishing since 2014.

Abstract:

Introduction & Aims: Ultradeformable vesicles (UDV) have recently become a promising tool for the development of improved and innovative dermal and transdermal therapies with numerous advantages over the conventional delivery systems. The aim of this research work was to study three closely related UDV, Transfersomes (T), Ethosomes (E) and Transethosomes (TE) in different situations, such as a high, medium and low active incorporation efficiencies obtained with actives of distinct polarities (Vitamin E, Melatonin and Caffeine, respectively). Methods: The actives were incorporated in the three UDV formulations which characterization parameters corresponded to: the mean vesicles size and polydispersity index measured by photon correlation spectroscopy; zeta potential determined by laser-doppler anemometry; viscosity; deformability evaluated by pressure driven transport; active loading and entrapment yield determined by HPLC assay of each active before and after the separation of the non incorporated fraction by ultracentrifugation, and finally, incorporation efficiency in which the lipids assay was based on an enzymatic-colorimetric test. After this characterization, topical delivery studies were performed in order to compare the selected UDV formulations regarding the release, skin permeation and penetration profiles. Results: All UDV formulations showed size values within the expected range, except Transethosomes prepared by method A (“transfersomal” method), which size was less than 100 nm in contrast to what happened in method B (“ethosomal” method). Zeta potential was negative and higher for formulations containing sodium cholate. The Incorporation Efficiency was much higher for Vitamin E than Caffeine –loaded UDV as theoretically expected attending to the respective Log P. In general, it was obtained the following order for UDV flux: TE > E ≥ T. This result was consistent with the release and skin penetration profiles for Vitamin E- loaded UDV. However, the results were totally the opposite for Caffeine-loaded UDV, which might be explained by the solubility and thermodynamic activity of this active in each formulation instead of the UDV deformability attending to the higher non incorporated fraction of Caffeine. Conclusion: Attending to the results obtained, Transethosomes are more deformable than Ethosomes and Transfersomes due to the presence of both ethanol and surfactant in their composition. These UDV are suitable for a deeper skin penetration.

Speaker
Biography:

Hesham M Ahmad has completed his M.D. at the age of 25years and Ph.D. at the age of 32 years from Al-Minia University, Al-Minia, Egypt. He did his postdoctoral studies at Thomas Jefferson University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA. He is the clinical director of Cocoon Medical Centre, Al-Ain, Abu Dhabi, U.A.E., a Dermatology and Aesthetic centre. He is also an assistant professor at Department of Dermatology at Al-Minia University Hospital, Al-Minia, Egypt. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Acne vulgaris is a common condition that represents a physically and emotionally debilitating disorder and requires an adequate treatment. This work assess the clinical efficacy, side effects and laboratory changes of serum lipids and liver function during oral isotretinoin therapy for acne vulgaris, comparing single versus twice-daily dose regimens. 58 patients with acne vulgaris were included and classified into: Group I (26 patients) received once daily dose and Group II (32 patients) received a twice daily dose of oral isotretinoin. Global acne scoring system was used to objectively determine acne severity and to evaluate clinical improvement. Serum cholesterol, triglycerides, ALT and AST were evaluated before and 3 months after treatment. Both regimens resulted in highly significant improvement of acne scores but with no statistically significant difference in efficacy between the two groups. Incidence of clinical side effects, mainly dry skin and mucous membranes and gastro-intestinal upset, were significantly more common among patients receiving once daily dose. Both regimens caused mild but statistically significant rise of serum cholesterol, ALT and AST with more prominent rise in serum triglycerides especially with twice daily dose. In conclusion: Oral isotretinoin is very effective in acne vulgaris treatment with no statistically significant difference in clinical efficacy between once or twice daily doses. Clinical side effects are more common among patients receiving single daily dose. Both regimens cause mild but statistically significant rise of serum cholesterol, ALT and AST with more rise in serum triglycerides especially with twice daily dose.

  • Track 3: Cosmetic Dermatology
    Track 4: Herbal Dermatology
    Track 5: Dermatological Therapeutics
Location: Ground Ball Room B
Speaker

Chair

Philip W Wertz

University of Iowa College of Dentistry, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Farrokh Khosravi

Texas Institute of Dermatology, USA

Session Introduction

Philip W. Wertz

University of Iowa College of Dentistry
USA

Title: Antimicrobial lipids at the skin surface

Time : 14:50-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Philip W. Wertz is a Professor in the Dows Institute, which is part of the University of Iowa College of Dentistry. He has more than 150 publications in refereed journals and numerous book chapters. He serves on several editorial boards

Abstract:

The skin surface represents our interface with the external environment, and as such, is our first line of defense against microbial colonization and infection. Lipids at the skin surface are thought to underlie at least part of an antimicrobial barrier. The skin surface is coated with sebaceous lipids, including lauric acid (C12:0) and sapienic acid (C16:1Δ6), both of which are uniquely potent antimicrobial agents. The free fatty acids are produced through the action of lipase(s) on sebaceous triglycerides. In addition, the stratum corneum contains antimicrobial free long-chain bases, sphingosine and dihydrosphingosine. The long-chain bases are thought to be produced through the action of ceramidases on ceramides near the skin surface. These antimicrobial lipids have been shown to kill a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus that is resistant to both methicillin and mupirocin. Furthermore, some of these lipids have been found to act synergistically with ethanol and with the antimicrobial peptide LL37. In fact, sapienic acid, with or without a low concentration of ethanol, was more effective than mupirocin. These lipids are thought to be part of the innate immune system of the skin. The possibility exists that topical formulations of these lipids could be used prophylactically to prevent infections in susceptible individuals, such as the elderly or people with atopic dermatitis. Such formulations could also be used to treat active infections.

Speaker
Biography:

Farrokh Khosravi, M.D., has completed his fellowship of Rheumatology at the age of 38 years from Shiraz University. He is a part time Assistant Professor of Medicine. His field of interest is autoimmune skin disease and has published several papers in peer reviewed journals and served as a reviewer for Various Medical Journals.

Abstract:

Drug induced osteoporosis (DIO) represents about 20% of all cases affected by Osteoporosis. DIO is one of the most challenging health issues in the elderly patients affected by various skin diseases. Any attempt to prevent or treat DIO will significantly decrease patients’ morbidity and mortality. Novel drugs have been recently developed for prevention and/or treatment of DIO. New methods of detection, prevention and treatment of DIO will be discussed.

Umit Tursen

Mersin University School of Medicine
Turkey

Title: Evidence-based treatment in Behcet’s diseases

Time : 15:30-15:50

Speaker
Biography:

Umit Tursen was born in Turkey. He graduated from Gazi University Faculty of Medicine as Medical Doctor. He completed the residency period of Dermatology in Ankara University, Faculty of Medicine, and Department of Dermatology between 1995-1999. He has been working in Mersin University, School of Medicine, and Department of Dermatology since 2000. He is the Director of Mersin University, School of Medicine, and Dermatology Department. He has published more than 80 papers in reputed journals, also books and serving as an editorial board member of repute. He won Behcet’s disease research award of “The scientific and technical research council of Turkey (TUBITAK)” in 1999. He is married and he has 2 children.

Abstract:

Behcet's disease (BD) is a chronic, relapsing, systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology with the clinical features of mucocutaneous lesions, ocular, vascular, articular, gastrointestinal, urogenital, pulmonary, and neurologic involvement. Mucocutaneous lesions figure prominently in the presentation and diagnosis, and may be considered the hallmarks of BD. Therefore, their recognition may permit earlier diagnosis and treatment. Although, the treatment has become much more effective in recent years, BD is still associated with severe morbidity and considerable mortality. The main aim of the treatment should be the prevention of irreversible organ damage. Therefore, close monitoring, early and appropriate treatment is mandatory to reduce morbidity and mortality. Traditional and current treatments with topical, paraocular and systemic corticosteroids, colchicine, dapsone, cyclosporine, azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclophosphamide and chlorambucil are summarized and recent insights into the pharmacology and effects of thalidomide, tacrolimus (FK-506), interferon-α, anti-TNF-α blocking monoclonal autoantibody (infliximab) and soluble TNF receptor (etanercept) are reviewed. We reviewed the current state of knowledge regarding the therapeutic approaches for BD and designed a stepwise, symptom-based, algorithmic approach, mainly based on controlled studies and our clinical experience in this field to provide a rational framework for selecting the appropriate therapy along the various treatment choices. Key clinical investigations with the status of ongoing clinical trials aimed at addressing the drug’s efficacy, surgical care, and studies that have raised the possibility of new therapeutic uses are also presented. The challenges posed by the drug’s teratogenicity and adverse effects are also considered, if present.

Hector Ricardo Galvan Garcia

Hospital Dermatology Dermoquirurgica
Mexico

Title: Onychomycosis: 1064-nm Nd: YAG q-switch laser treatment

Time : 15:50-16:10

Speaker
Biography:

Hector Ricardo Galvan Garcia has completed his M.D.at the age 25 years from Guadalajara University and postdoctoral studies from Institut of Dermatology of Jalisco. He is director of Hospital Dermatology Dermoquirurgica in Jalisco, Mexico and he has published more 20 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Laser treatment of onychomycosisis a quick and easy method without complicationes. Two hundred patients with a KOH(+) , onychoscopy(+), confirmed clinical diagnosis of onychomycosis were included in the present study. All of the patients were treated in a single sesión with a 1064-nm neodymium-dopedyttrium-aluminumgarnet (Nd:YAG)q-switch laser. There was a 100% clinical response rate within the 18-month follow-up period with no side effects. This method is proposed as a novel and safe method for the treatment of ungualpathology.

Speaker
Biography:

Mani Kumar Sharma did his MBBS from Kolkata University, India and completed his MD from Utkal University, India. He is presently the director of Sharma Skin Foundation, Siliguri India, a premier skin foundation of eastern India. He is also the President of North Bengal Unit of Indian association of Dermatologists, Venereologists and Leprologists. He has been an original scientific research worker and has more than 20 publications in reputed journals to his credit. His works on mycoses and Pure Neuritic Leprosy in rural India are invaluable.

Abstract:

Objective: To study the role of ultrasonography (USG) of nerves as a screening and follow up imaging modality in clinically suspected cases of Pure Neuritic Leprosy (PNL). Materials and Methods: Peripheral nerves of 450 clinically suspected cases of Pure Neuritic Leprosy were evaluated by high resolution ultrasonography and compared with histologic findings. The cases were categorized according to the USG criterias-echogenicity of nerves-echogenic, hypoechoic and hyperechoic, thickness of nerves-normal and suspected nerves were compared. Results: The analysis showed that 88% of hyphoechoic and thickened nerves showed AFB in histology. 38% of hypoechoic nerves without thickening showed AFB in histology. Nerve abscess was seen in 3% of cases. 40% of after treatment showed misted echogenicity. Conclusion: Ultrasonography (USG) can be used as a screening and follow up imaging modality in suspected cases of Pure Neuritic Leprosy (PNL) in endemic areas as it is a non-invasive, easy to use, cheap, sensitive and highly reliable tool. References: High resolution sonography of the peripheral nervous system, a review of literature; European journal of neurology 11 (5) 305-314; Echotexture of peripheral nerves correlation between Ultrasonography and histologic findings; Radiology, 1995 vol. 197 pp 291-296.

Break: Networking & Refreshments Break 16:30-16:45 @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Jing Shang has completed his Ph.D at the age of 33 years from Free University of Berlin in Germany. She is the deputy director of Center for Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University and the secretary general of Applied Pharmacology Committee, Chinese Pharmaceutical Association. She has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

Skin disease belongs to a complex disease, such as vitiligo, psoriasis, alopecia areata, atopic dermatitis, etc. Its specific mechanism is so far unclear. There is a great difficulty in treatment, enough to cause much pain to the patient. Skin is as the largest organ of the human body. Its existence is not just for the body barrier to the outside threatened homeostasis, and the skin and its accessories is widely innervated, the sensory nerve in the skin is directly upward to the cerebral cortex. The skin can be independent to synthetize and secret the stress hormones to maintain local and systemic homeostasis, and is also one of the biggest target organs of these hormones. Taken together, the skin is as the body's largest neuroendocrine and immune organs. Clinical survey found that the onset and development of many skin diseases were closely related to mental factors. A variety of skin diseases are contributed to the liability under psychological stress, such as urticant, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, psoriasis, acne, hair loss, etc. Mental stress can induce or aggravate the skin disorders. Psychological soothing and keeping a good state of mind can both help to alleviate these diseases. Now, for the pathogenesis analysis of these diseases, a preliminary study suggests that these skin diseases including psoriasis, vitiligo, alopecia areata, atopic dermatitis, etc., indeed have associations with mental stress. When the body responds to mental stress, the skin will present a corresponding change, such as hot flashes, sweating, etc. In addition to these visible external reactions, we also found that the skin showed significantly increased immune cells and mast cell degranulation. Large number of experimental and clinical studies proved that mental stress involved in the development and progression of many skin diseases. In response to mental stress, the body starts the hypothalamus - pituitary - adrenal (HPA) axis to combat stress conditions. Meanwhile, skin has its own HPA axis to respond to external stress and regulate skin function such as melanogenesis. Therefore, there is a problem that how HPA axis mediates the effect of mental stress on skin function, so as to promote the occurrence and development of skin diseases. To study the skin's response in face of mental stress and to explore the etiology and pathogenesis of skin diseases related to mental factors, it is of great significance and importance to the exploration of treatment targets and methods involved in skin disease. This topic aims to study on the role of HPA axis in mental stress affecting skin functions, and investigate the mechanism of natural medicine HZCZ for regulating skin functions in a multi-target manner. This study provides a new idea of drug development for complex disease.

Speaker
Biography:

Arpi Avetisyan is a Research Associate at Nairian CJSC, an Armenia-based all-natural cosmetics manufacturer. Her primary responsibility in the company is technology development for production and scientific research in the field of herbal cosmetics. Arpi is interested in safe use of various herbs and essential oils to address diverse cosmetology issues. Before joining Nairian CJSC, Arpi was a Researcher at the Institute of Chemical Physics of NAS of Republic of Armenia. She obtained her MS degree in Chemistry from Yerevan State University, Yerevan, Armenia.

Abstract:

The aim of this study was to analyze the chemical composition of essential oils from three different species of basil, O.basilicumpurpureum('Purple basil'), O.basilicumthyrsiflora('Thai basil'), and O. citrodorum ('Lemon basil'),and to test their biological activities. The three basil species were cultivated in the same field, at the elevation of 1600m above sea level, in the Kotayk Region of Armenia. The essential oils were obtained by steam distillation in a Clevenger-type apparatus, a HP GC-MS setup was used to determine their chemical composition. According to the results, Purple basil essential oil contained 57.3% of methyl-chavicol (estragol); Thai basil oil had 68.0% of linalool and the main constituents of Lemon basil oil were nerol (23.0%) and citral (20.7%). The antioxidant activities of these essential oils were measured using DPPH assays. The highest antioxidant activity was demonstrated by Thai basil essential oil: IC50 value for it was equal to the standardized Grapefruit Seed Extract used as a control sample. The tyrosinase inhibition abilities of all three oils were also assessed. Obtained data indicate that basil essential oils can be useful natural agents for cosmetic applications and food dietary supplements. To test the possibilities for cosmetic application, several synergistic mixes containing essential oils from all three basil species were created and added to cosmetic cream bases. The oil mixes used in the creams were designed taking into account the dermal maximum values defined for their constituents ["Essential Oils Safety", Tisserand&Young, 2014]. The creams were used for in-vivo testing on volunteers.

Sevil Alan

Akdeniz University
Turkey

Title: Acne and treatment

Time : 17:25-17:45

Speaker
Biography:

Sevil Alan was born in Burdur, Turkey, in 1978. She received her medical degree from Ege Medical School in İzmir, Turkey and completed his dermatology residency at the Adana Numune Education and Research Hospital in Adana, Turkey. Today, Dr. Sevil Alan is a specialist of dermatology at the Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Antalya.

Abstract:

Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that effects the pilosebaceous unit and is characterized with comedones, papules, pustules, nodules and occasionally with scars. The mainstay of acne therapy includes: topical retinoids, topical antibiotics, benzoyl peroxide (BP), and oral isotretinoin for severe cases. Current acne treatment regimens often require patients to use multiple medications, some of which may have side effects. Many of the new therapies discussed in this presentation.

Ufuk Kavuzlu

Mersin University Faculty of Medicine
Turkey

Title: Off Label uses of vitamin-D treatment in Dermatology

Time : 17:45 -18:05

Speaker
Biography:

Ufuk Kavuzlu received his medical degree from Mersin University in 2011, at the age of 24. Since 2013 he is an assistant doctor in Mersin University Hospital which his ongoing residency training in dermatology has started in.

Abstract:

Vitamin D is used in patients with psoriasis for years since it provides keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation regulation it can also be used in skin diseases other than psoriasis.The aim of the study is to detect the off-label use of vitamin D in the skin diseases. All data about off label uses of vitamin D in treatment in dermatology were screened on medline database. Obtained studies were grouped according to types of diseases. 60 articles were included in the study. Strong evidences are found that the topical use of vitamin D in vitiligo as a part of combined therapy is effective. It is also showed that use of vitamin D as topical treatment has beneficial effect in several skin diseases such as morphea, eritema annulare centrifugum, prurigo nodularis, warts, ichtyosis; and as systemic treatment in diseases such as granuloma annulare.Vitamin D is not only effective in psoriasis, but also in the treatment of many skin diseases due to regulatory effect on keratinocytes and immunoregulatory properties. But still more comprehensive studies about off label use of vitamin D in dermatology is required.