Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 5th International Conference on Clinical & Experimental Dermatology New Orleans, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Reza F. Ghohestani

Texas Institute of Dermatology
USA

Keynote: Personalized Medicine: What's New ?

Time : 09:15-09:45

OMICS International Dermatology-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Reza F. Ghohestani photo
Biography:

Dr. Ghohestani completed his internship in surgery at Pennsylvania Hospital, the Nation’s first hospital and one of the top 100 hospitals in U.S. He then did a residency in dermatology at Thomas Jefferson University, one of the top dermatology programs in the country. He obtained a master’s degree in Cutaneous Biology, Cosmetology, and Skin Pharmacology, and a Ph.D. in Skin Immunobiology from Claude Bernard University , one of the top Universities in France. He was mentored by professors Jean Thivolet, Alan Claudy, and Jean Francois Nicolas. Dr. Ghohestani then did a Molecular Biology fellowship at the Nice School of Medicine, Nice, France. Dr. Ghohestani served as the principal investigator and team leader for many years at various Academic Institutes. His research was funded by the National Institute of Health, the Dermatology Foundation, and the American Skin Association, among others. Dr. Ghohestani was on Faculty as an Assistant and then Associate Professor at Thomas Jefferson University (1998 – 2007) before moving to San Antonio, Texas. Dr. Ghohestani is a former Chief and Associate Professor of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Dr. Ghohestani has been recently selected as a member of National Institute of Medicine and counsel to President. Dr. Ghohestani’s outstanding work and dedication to excellence have earned him numerous honors and peer recognitions including the American Skin Association Career Award, the Dermatology Foundation Career Award, the Charles Grupper Prize by the French Society of Dermatology, the Stelwagon Award for Best Publication by the College of Physicians of Philadelphia and the Commitment to Professionalism award by the Pennsylvania Medical Society. Dr. Ghohestani is skilled in the art and science of skin care, dermatology and surgery. He continually searches for and implements the best treatment options for his patients. Dr. Ghohestani has published over 100 papers and abstracts in medical journals. He also served as the co-editor of the European Journal of Dermatology from 2001-2008. He speaks frequently to a variety of public and professional organizations.

Abstract:

Keynote Forum

Namrita Lall

University of Pretoria
South Africa

Keynote: Green medicines and cosmeceuticals

Time : 10:30-12:30

OMICS International Dermatology-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Namrita Lall photo
Biography:

Namrita Lall has completed his Ph.D from the University of Pretoria and was a visiting scientist at the University of Illinois, Chicago and Kings College London. She has published more than 100 papers in reputed. She is also the co-inventor of 12 national and international patents. At only 45, this medicinal plant scientist at the University of Pretoria is ranked in the top 1% of the global Essential Science Indicators list of influential academics who write about pharmacology and toxicology. Earlier this year, she received the Order of Mapungubwe- South Africa’s highest honour - from President Jacob Zuma, in recognition of her research. She is a finalist in the 2014 National Science and Technology Forum Award in the category that recognises the outstanding contributions of researchers over the past 10 years.

Abstract:

South Africa has a wealthy supply of plants (about 23 500 species of higher plants). South African plants for various purposes such as infectious diseases, cancer, skin-hyperpigmentation problems, melasma, Periodontal diseases, and for ACNE problem have been scientifically investigated. Steady progress in evaluating potential medicinal plants for product development with dermatological importance has been made. \r\n\r\nA significant number of plants with potential inhibitory activity against Propionibacterium acnes are undergoing clinical studies. Colonization of this bacteria contribute to the etiology of the disease; ‘Acne vulgaris’ which is a most common skin disorder. Several agents which have been found to interfere with the transcription of genes encoding tyrosinase- protein, have been identified which are being considered to result in marketed product with application for skin-disorders such as melasma, skin-hyperpigmentation etc. There has not been any product for combating these problems thus far from South African plants. The sample formulated into a cream was applied on 25 healthy volunteers for skin-irritacy testing at an industry, “Future Cosmetics” in Pretoria. The sample did not show any irritacy effect, rather soothing effect was observed. The samples were further subjected to clinical studies and has been recommended for their use for melisma and skin-toning purposes. The research results have attracted a number of national and international Cosmeceutical companies who are willing to commercialise selected South African plant extracts and purified compounds emanated from our research. This is of important economic value because at present South African companies import cosmetic actives from overseas. The impact of research and development into local plants will therefore have huge spin-offs for both communities and cosmetic companies. \r\n

Break: Networking & Refreshments Break 10:15-10:30 @ Foyer
  • Workshops
Location: Ground Ball Room B

Session Introduction

Erin E Boh

Tulane University
USA

Title: Psoriasis: Rethinking an ancient disease as Biochemistry & Immunology advances

Time : 10:30-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

Erin Boh MD PhD received her PhD in Biochemistry from Tulane University Medical School in 1980, and her MD in 1985 from Tulane. After completion of her residency in Dermatology at UT Southwestern Medical School, she started on faculty at Tulane University Health Sciences Center and has been on faculty since 1990. She currently is Professor of Dermatology and is chairman of the Department of Dermatology. Dr Boh has authored numerous peer reviewed articles, chapters in text books. She has served on numerous committees for the AAD, WDS. She is past president of the Louisiana Dermatology Society. She is currently on the Medical Board for National Psoriasis Foundation and is Board of Directors elect for the AAD.

Abstract:

This is a review of the developments in Biochenmistry and Immunology that have led to a clearer understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis and the mechanism of actions of pivotal biologics which are used to treat this chronic immune mediated disease.

Larry E Millikan

Tulane University
USA

Title: Drug Eruption

Time : 10:30-12:30

Speaker
Biography:

LEM trained at Univ Michigan served on faculty U Missouri (11years) and Tulane Founding chair (25 years) and has been emeritus since 2006. He serves as Secretary General of the IACD, is on several editorial boards and is active in the EADV, AAD, IACD, ASDS, and ISDS.

Abstract:

Drug eruptions have a wide spectrum of presentations, from Erythema and minimal urtication to the severe widespread mechano-bullous lesions as life threatening as third degree burns. Therefore early Dx and prompt Rx essential. This action template will be used in several presentations of reactions.

Speaker
Biography:

Baló-Banga (J. Mátyás) has graduated from Semmelweis Medical University, Budapest. After residency and specialization in dermatology-venereology he was assistant professor in the Dept. of Experimental Oncology at Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis. After returning from the US he defended his PhD Thesis in Budapest and became specialist in laboratory medicine and in allergy-immunology. Up to 1989 he participated in basic and clinical research with the Austrian Centre Seibersdorf. In the 1990-s he was elected as Secretary General of the Hungarian Dermatologic Society. After 28 years at the University Dermatology Department he became head of the Dermatology in the Military Hospital. He wrote or edited 20 books&book chapters and has ~40 papers cited in international medical databases.

Abstract:

Recently an International Consensus (ICON) on Drug Allergy has been published. This document includes skin and provocation tests in the diagnostic workup after drug eruptions but does not recommend in vitro assays because of lacking standardization. Humoral tests available on the market have low sensitivity, T-cell based cellular tests depend on cell cultures which last 3-5 days and have many requirements. Their results are often difficult to interpret for clinicians especially in relation of diverse phenotypic expression of drug induced skin injuries. Our aim was to overcome those problems by introducing a rapid reproducible assay based on preformed IL-6 release by the patients’ mononuclear cells. Earlier, detection of the culprit drug induced rapid changes was done by morphometry on T-cell nuclei after short exposure to simple media and using 4-10 sequential molarity based drug dilutions. The present methods included ELISA-based measurement of rapid specific release of IL-6 from isolated mononuclear cells upon 20 minutes incubation with 0.15-0.5 µM (final) solutions of pure drugs (mol.mass 76-4000 Da) with either PHA-P or ConA as positive controls. ConA increased IL-6 release in concentration and time dependent manner. This indicated a preformed cellular pool for this cytokine. The test results have reflected both severity and surface extensions only with culprit drugs (n=43) of various pharmacology and revealed a 85.4% sensitivity against in vivo challenges.

  • Track 6: Pediatric Dermatology
    Track 7: Diagnostic Techniques in Dermatology
    Track 8: Dermatological Oncology
    Track 9: Dermatology Therapies and Advances
Location: Ground Ball Room B
Speaker

Chair

Zachary A. Cooper

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Hector Ricardo Ralvan Garcia

Hospital Dermatology Dermoquirurgica, Mexico

Session Introduction

Aziz Ghahary

British Columbia Professional Fire Fighters
Canada

Title: A new hope in preventing the progression and treating Alopecia areata

Time : 13:15-13:35

Speaker
Biography:

Aziz Ghahary, PhD and Professor, the director of the BC professional Firefighters ‘Burn and Wound Healing Research Group has published more than 168 peer-reviewed articles some of which directly related to autoimmune diseases such as type I diabetes. Dr. Ghahary has been awarded more than 50 research grants from different local, national and international granting agencies. Dr. Ghahary is the leading investigator in identifying a serum 14-3-3 eta protein as a biomarker for early detection of RA and psoriatic RA and this test has now been launched by the Quest Diagnosis and Lifelab in US and Canada, respectively. Finally, he recently identified a small molecular with anti-scaring properties, which has now been approved by the Health Canada and the Vancouver General Hospital Ethic Committee to proceed to Phase 1 Clinical Trial.

Abstract:

Unfortunately, all treatment strategies currently used for Alopecia Areata (AA) are unsatisfactory. There are now supporting evidence that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are involved in the pathogenesis of AA. Here, we targeted CD4+ and CD8+ by generating a L-tryptophan, an essential amino acid, deficient environment within which these cells can no longer become activated against hair follicle. To achieve this, we have successfully used IP injection of IDO, an enzyme that breaks down L-tryptophan to its metabolites, expressing cells in an AA mouse model and showed that none of AA affected mice developed AA as compared to 80% of control mice which developed extensive AA within 8-16 weeks after transplantation of an AA affected skin. The size of the lymph nodes in IDO treated mice was significantly smaller than that of non-IDO treated alopecia mice consistent with an absence of an inflammatory response. Importantly, this treatment significantly reduced the number of infiltrated immune cells (CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells) at the site of AA affected skin as compared to that of controls. These findings indicate that IP injected IDO expressing dermal fibroblasts controls the inflammation and thereby reverses the progression of AA in this model. In conclusion, we have provided a supporting evince that the progression of AA can be prevented by using a novel strategy in generating a tryptophan deficient environment within which active CD4+ and CD8+ Tcells attacking hair follicles become dysfunctional and no longer are able to prevent the hair growth in our AA model.

Zachary A. Cooper

University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
USA

Title: Understanding responses to therapy and rationale for combination strategies

Time : 13:35-13:55

Speaker
Biography:

Zachary A. Cooper completed his PhD from University of Maryland, Baltimore and postdoctoral studies from Brown University and Harvard Medical School. He joined the faculty at MD Anderson Cancer Center in 2013 with a dual appointment in the Departments of Surgical Oncology and Genomic Medicine. Dr. Cooper is a translational scientist whose research focuses on the interface of the immune system and targeted therapy in melanoma. He has published more than 30 manuscripts in reputed journals including Nature, Nature Genetics, Cancer Discovery, Journal of Clinical Investigations, Science Signaling, Cancer Research, and Clinical Cancer Research among others.

Abstract:

There have been significant advances in melanoma therapy over the past several years, with several molecularly targeted and immunotherapeutic agents recently FDA-approved for use the treatment of patients with metastatic disease. However with these advances, we are posed with therapeutic dilemmas with regard to timing and sequence of therapy. Namely, there is significant debate as to whether to begin treatment with targeted therapy versus immunotherapy upfront, and at which point to change treatment strategy. This is highly relevant, as each of these treatments as mono-therapy have significant limitations.
As a group, we have focused on better understanding response and resistance to therapy through longitudinal tissue and blood analyses in patients on targeted therapy and immunotherapy. We have worked with investigators worldwide to better understand response and resistance to therapy, and have gained critical insights that have led to therapeutic inroads for patients with melanoma. This includes the use of combination strategies, such as adding immune checkpoint blockade to a backbone of molecularly targeted therapy. Clinical trials combining these strategies are currently underway, and it is becoming increasingly apparent that complexities exist with regard to these combinations.
A better understanding of mechanisms of response to combination strategies through translational research is critical, and is best performed on longitudinal patient samples during the course of therapy, which may inform (and be informed by) parallel murine studies. Ultimately, ideal combination approaches will be built on a deep understanding of molecular and immune effects of each therapy in isolation, as well as in combination.

Speaker
Biography:

Robert Gensure completed his M.D. and Ph.D. at Tulane University School of Medicine and postdoctoral training at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is currently an Associate Professor at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and an attending physician at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore. He has published more than 40 papers, review articles, and book chapters.

Abstract:

Alopecia is a very common condition with a variety of causes, including androgenic stimulation (male-pattern hair loss, polycystic ovarian syndrome), drug-induced (chemotherapy alopecia), and autoimmune disorders (alopecia areata). Hair loss can cause psychological stress, and the lack of effective therapies can cause patients to pursue off-label use of potentially hazardous treatments. Parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) is a hair cycle regulator which provides a promising target for development of alopecia therapies. While early studies focused on using PTHrP antagonists to prolong the anagen phase, more recent studies suggest that PTHrP agonists can initiate the anagen phase by increasing levels of beta-catenin in hair follicles. Skin targeted PTHrP analogs have been shown to increase hair growth in animal models of chemotherapy alopecia and alopecia areata. The treatments result in increased number of hair follicles and resolve the dystrophic changes seen in these conditions. There is an associated increase in beta-catenin levels, which suggests that PTHrP agonists act through activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. This new finding introduces a promising target for drug development for many causes of alopecia.

Speaker
Biography:

Hector Ricardo Galvan Garcia has completed his MD at the age 25 years from Guadalajara University and postdoctoral studies from Institute of Dermatology of Jalisco. He is Director of Hospital Dermatology Dermoquirurgica in Jalisco, Mexico and he has published more 20 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Abstract:

In This study the effectiveness of laser therapy demostratedNy: YAG( 1064nm / 532nm) and pulse intensive light on the in vitro treatment of superficial mycoses, deep and atypical mycobacteria. Was performed in Petridishes with agar sabouraud cultures of t.rubrum, m.canis, t.tounsurans, t.mentagrophytes as well and deeperfungi, f.prodrosoi, s.schenki and c.carrioni, also sapphire glass tubes with culture médium lowenstein Jensen for m. abscessus.,allthese lumínicas exposing them to these two therapies. Finding in all cases a favorable response in inivicion growth of colonies, varying according to set this type of ligth, intensity, time and mechanics of it. Where by This reopening a new horizon in the dermatological therapeutics of the future.

Speaker
Biography:

Yasmine Issa has completed her MBSCh at the age of 24 from Alexandria Faculty of Medicine, then completed her MD and PHD. In 2008-2009, Yasmine was a research fellow in Leipzig University Clinic of Dermatology, Allergology and Venerology. Currently, she is a lecturer in Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology department, Alexandria Faculty of Medicine , where she resumes her postdoctoral studies. She is a researcher in nanomedicine lab, genomics center , and Egybiotech, a leading research incubator in Egypt. She is a reviewer in the journal “Andrologia”. She has publications and posters in the field of andrology, cardiovascular diseases,and nanomedicine.

Abstract:

Background: There is a strong body of evidence supporting an autoimmune basis forgeneralized vitiligo. B lymphocyte activating factor of the tumour necrosis factor family (BAFF)is known to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of autoimmune diseases. Objective: To evaluate serum levels of BAFF and peripheral blood CD19+ Blymphocytes in patients with generalized vitiligo and to explore the effect of treatment withnarrow band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) on their levels. Methods: Serum BAFF and peripheral blood CD19+ B lymphocytes were measured in30 patients with generalized vitiligo and 30 healthy control subjects. Patients received NB-UVBsessions for three months and follow up samples were then collected. Results: Serum BAFF and peripheral blood CD19+ B lymphocytes were significantlyhigher in patients than in control subjects (p<0.001). No significant correlation was detectedbetween serum BAFF and CD19+ B lymphocytes. In addition, correlations between serumBAFF or CD19+ B lymphocytes and disease duration, activity and severity were nonsignificant. After treatment with NB-UVB, significant reduction in the vitiligo area severity index (VASI)score was detected (p=0.02), but serum BAFF levels and Peripheral blood CD19+ Blymphocytes did not show significant change. Conclusion: Elevation in serum BAFF levels and CD19+ B lymphocytes in generalized vitiligo patients possibly provides further support to the autoimmune hypothesis of the disease and to the possible role played by B lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of the disease

Speaker
Biography:

Krystyna Mojsiewicz-Pieńkowska PhD, D.Sc is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Chemistry at the Medical University of Gdansk, Faculty of Pharmacy with Subfaculty of Laboratory Medicine, Gdańsk, Poland.She is also an expert in the National Centre for Research and Development. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals.Krystyna Mojsiewicz-Pieńkowska is an active reviewer for the scientific pharmaceutical and chemical journals. Currently scientific and research activity is related with: studies of the penetration and permeation of silicones and drugs through the human skin; development of analytical methods for drug analysis; silicones application in pharmacy, medicine and cosmetic products

Abstract:

Skin diseases and dermatology problems depend on many factors. One of the reasons is the presence of various substances in medical products on skin, personal care products or cosmetics which are not indifferent for skin. For example, active pharmaceutical ingredients API and excipients can irritate the skin and cause allergic reactions, e.g. itchy rash, eruptions, atopic skin disease, other. However, sometimes patients or consumers do not have to feel any reaction but API or excipients can irreversibly change skin barrier. This is a very negative effect. First of all, the skin does not sufficiently prevent the entrance of noxious compounds or microorganisms. The damage the skin structure can cause to increase of the uncontrolled penetration into the stratum corneum and even permeate into the deeper layers of the skin of substances which can be toxicity. To the other hand, destruction of the organization the human skin structure impacts on the loss of semi-permeable skin barrier function for activity substances which are applied on the skin in treatment different diseases. The increase penetration, permeation and percutaneous substances absorption can be disturb of kinetics of drug delivery through the skin at a optimal rate. Apart from these, some chemical substances (as excipients) can cause to cytotoxic effect on cells. A new interdisciplinary approach is presented to demonstrate possibility of penetration the low molecular linear and cyclic methyl siloxanes (silicones) to human stratum corneum and permeation to the deeper layers of the skin (epidermis and dermis). On the basis of the fluorescence microscope as well as ATR FT-IR spectroscopy both the penetration and permeation to this skin layer as well as impact on damage of corneocytes of the stratum corneum was observed. It will be shown that the phenomenon alteration the skin barrier was due to damage of stratum corneum structure in conjunction with distinct disturbances in the lipid structure the mortar lipid of the stratum corneum. The results present that cyclic and linear methyl siloxanes are able to overcome the barrier of the skin due to interaction between silicones and bilayers SC lipids. At the end of the oral presentation the results concerning the cytotoxic effects for immortal keratinocytes cell line HaCaT are presented. These conclusions are very important for the safety of using these compounds, particularly in dermatology and toxicology. Low molecular linear and cyclic methyl siloxanes are commonly used as excipients in medical products for skin (e.g. Rozex Metronidazolum) and personal care products (e.g. Penaten Baby or Body Lotion Garnier). Apart from this they are used across a wide spectrum of personal care applications, including antiperspirants, skin, hair and nail care formulations, grooming products, sun protection products, personal lubricants, and cosmetic preparations. It causes the significant human exposure to this group of compounds. They can be applied both by adults, children and infants. It must notice that so far, the transdermal route has not been described in the literature as a possible route of penetration and permeation by the linear and cyclic methyl siloxanes. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This project was supported by Polish Ministry of Science (The National Centre for Research and Development NCN, grant 2013/11/B/NZ7/02076)

Daudi Rajabu Mavura

Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College
Tanzania

Title: Initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adults with skin complaints in northern Tanzania

Time : 15:15-15:35

Speaker
Biography:

Daudi Mavura is the current principal of the Regional dermatology training center (RDTC) in Moshi, Tanzania where he also lectures.The RDTC is a tertiary training institute of both The Tumaini University and Muhimbili University of Health sciences. Dr. Mavura holds a Medical Degree from the University of Carlos J. Finlaty in Cuba and a Masters of Medicine degree from the Tumaini University .He has subspecialised in dermatosurgery from UKT-Germany and the Univesida de alcala de Henare in Spain. He has published and co-authored several papers mostly in tropical dermatology. He is fluent in English, Spanish and his native Kiswahili.

Abstract:

Abnormal skin findings are identified in over 90% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) - infected persons globally. A prospective cohort study of HIV-infected subjects presenting with skin complaints in northern Tanzania was undertaken. Consecutive HIV- infected subjects presenting with skin complaints, who met criteria for ART initiation, were recruited at a Tanzanian Regional Dermatology Training Center. A single dermatologist evaluated all subjects; baseline skin biopsies were performed, and CD4+ cell counts and plasma HIV RNA levels were measured. All subjects received a fixed – dose combination of stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine. A total of 100 subjects were enrolled; 86 subjects completed six months of follow-up. Median baseline CD4+ cell counts and plasma HIV RNA levels were 120 cells/ul and 5.2 log10 copies/ml. The most common dermatological condition was papular pruritic eruption (47%). The median baseline score on the burn scale was 38%. After six months, 10 subjects had achieved the complete resolution of the skin abnormalities. In those without complete resolution, the median Burn Scale score improved to 7 %. Five patients developed new eruptions by month 3, which in two cases were attributed to drug reactions. In the 86 subjects remaining on ART after the six months, the median CD4+ cell count had increased to 474 cells/ul and plasma HIV RNA levels were <400 copies/ml in 85 ( 99%) subjects. Patients with HIV infection with skin complaints experienced marked clinical improvements following ART initiation.

Break: Networking & Refreshments Break 15:35-15:50 @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Claudia Sa Guimaraes has completed his graduation in Medicine at the age 24 years from Souza Marques School Medicine and specialization in dermatology at Rio de Janeiro Santa Casa de Misericordia. She has published 3 books, more than 4 chapter on dermatology text books, three articles in reputed journals and worked at Brazilian journal of Medicine 14 years. Since 2011 have been collabored with Federal University of Rio de Janeiro at Laboratory of Celular Biology of Fungus where Taissa Villa with Sonia Rozental supervision create a new model of in vitro fungal biofilms emerged from the interest on the laser treatment of onychomycosis in your doctor's office.

Abstract:

Onychomycosis represent approximately 50% of all nail diseases worldwide. In warmer and more humid countries like Brazil, the incidence of onychomycosis caused by non-dermatophyte molds (NDM, including Fusarium spp.) or yeasts (including Candida albicans) has been increasing. Traditional antifungal treatments used for the dermatophyte-borne disease are less effective against onychomycosis caused by NDM. Although some laser and light treatments have demonstrated clinical efficacy against onychomycosis, their FDA-approval as 'first line' therapy is pending, partly due to the lack of well-demonstrated fungicidal activity in a reliable in vitro model. Here, we describe a reliable new in vitro model to determine the fungicidal activity of laser and light therapy against onychomycosis caused by Fusariumoxysporum and C. albicans. Biofilms formed in vitro on sterile human nail fragments were treated with 1064-nm neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser (Nd:YAG), 420 nm intense pulsed light (IPL 420), IPL 420 followed by Nd:YAG, or near infrared light (NIR 700 - 1400 nm). Light and laser antibiofilm effects were evaluated using cell viability assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All treatments were highly effective against C. albicans and F. oxysporum biofilms, resulting in decreases in cell viability of 45-60% for C. albicans and 92-100% for F. oxysporum. The model described here yielded fungicidal activities that matched more closely those observed in the clinic, when compared to published in vitro models for laser and light therapy. Thus, our model might represent an important tool for the initial testing, validation and 'fine-tuning' of laser and light therapy against onychomychosis.

  • Workshop
Location: Ground Ball Room B

Session Introduction

Moris Topaz

The Technion, Israel Institute of Technology Israel

Title: Changing the standards of wound care: New concepts for treatment of minor and large wound defects
Speaker
Biography:

Moris Topaz, has completed his MD., and PhD at the Ben Gurion University, Israel and postdoctoral Fellowship at the Eastern Virginia Graduate School of Medicine, USA. He is the director of the Plastic Surgery Unit, the Hillel Yaffe Medical Center and was affiliated for years to the Department of Chemistry, Bar Ilan University, Israel. Dr. Topaz has developed innovative devices and technologies to expedite wound healing. He has written and published articles in a variety of medical journals, and has actively participated in numerous scientific meetings globally. Currently he is leading a national project in wound healing in China as a visiting foreign expert professor.

Abstract:

Stress-relaxation is a well-established mechanism for laboratory skin stretching, with limited clinical application in conventional suturing techniques due to the inherent, concomitant induction of ischemia, necrosis and subsequent suture failure. Skin defects that cannot be primarily closed are a common difficulty during reconstructive surgery. The TopClosure® tension-relief system (TRS) is a novel device for wound closure and secure, attaching to the skin through a wide area of attachment, in an adjustable manner, enabling primary closure of medium to large skin defects. We present demonstrative cases requiring resection of large to huge tumors customarily requiring closure by skin graft or flaps. TRS was applied during surgery serving as a tension-relief platform for tension sutures, to enable primary skin-defect closure by cycling of stress-relaxation, and following surgery as skin-secure system until complete wound closure. All skin defects were manipulated by the TRS through stress-relaxation, without undermining of skin, enabling primary skin closure and eliminating the need for skin grafts and flaps. Immediate wound closure ranged 26 – 135 min. Complications were minimal and donor site morbidity was eliminated. Surgical time, hospital stay and costs were reduced and wound aesthetics were improved. TRS is novel technology that enables the utilization of the viscoelastic properties of the skin to an extreme level, extending the limits of primary wound closure by the stress-relaxation principle. This is achieved via a simple device application that aid immediate primary wound closure and downgrade the complexity of surgical procedures for a wide range of applications on a global scale.

  • Special Session
Location: Ground Ball Room B
Biography:

Alexander Zink, M.D., M.P.H. is a Dermatologist and Public Health Specialist at the Department of Dermatology and Allergy at Technische Universität München in Munich, Germany. His research interests include public health and prevention strategies in dermatology and new treatment approaches in dermatologic diseases with main focus on immunoadsorption. He has published multiple peer-reviewed articles in highly ranked international journals and served as a specialist for immunoadsorption on several past international meetings.

Abstract:

Patients severely affected by atopic dermatitis (AD) commonly have highly elevated serum IgE levels. Until today, the role of IgE in the pathogenesis of AD remains a highly controversial issue. To evaluate the role of IgE in AD we developed an anti-IgE-treatment approach by combining immunoadsorption (IA) and anti-IgE antibody omalizumab (OMZ) for maximum possible IgE serum level reduction in patients with severe, therapy-refractory AD and elevated IgE levels. First patients treated by IA and OMZ all showed an significant reduction of IgE-levels after IA and a further dropping of biological active IgE during treatment with omalizumab. A reverse trend was observed after stopping treatment during the follow-up period. Parallel, a clear improvement of AD was seen during the treatment period followed by an aggravation during observational follow-up. Combining IA and OMZ in atopic dermatitis thus seems suitable to effectively reduce elevated serum IgE levels and to improve clinical symptoms of severe refractory AE without other systemic treatments. However, further studies with larger patient numbers are needed to strengthen our conclusion based on the first findings of our novel and promising anti-IgE treatment approach in severe atopic dermatitis.