Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th International Conference on Clinical and Experimental Dermatology Chicago,Illinois, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Ayman El-Attar

American Aesthetic Association
USA

Keynote: The TOPAL technique 10 years of experience

Time : 09:30-10:00

OMICS International Dermatology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ayman El-Attar photo
Biography:

Ayman El-Attar is the President of the American Aesthetic Association. He has Founded Derma Laser Centers of New Jersey established in October 2002. He has graduated from Alexandria Medical School with honors in 1987. He has completed residencies in both General Surgery and Family Medicine and obtained a Masters degree of Surgery in 1992. He was an Assistant Lecturer of Surgery at Alexandria University and a Visiting Instructor of Surgery at the Medical College of Ohio. He has finalized his PhD thesis in 1998

Abstract:

The TOPAL technique combines the best of use of safe in-office tumescent technique, the PAL system by MicroAire and using laser lipolysis device at the end of the procedure. Laser lipolysis first approved in the USA in 2006 had their inherent limitation on the amount of fat that can be removed in one session making more physicians skeptical about their efficacy as a standalone tool for patient seeking liposuction. After tumescent anesthesia, the technique achieves dramatic results by debulking that fat using the PAL system, then delivering Nd:YAG laser energy through the small skin entry to heat the fatty deposits and the skin up to 42o C. After performing over five thousand procedures utilizing TOPAL™ our patient satisfaction rate is 97% and our touch up rate is 3%. Both much better figures than those for traditional liposuction or laser assisted lipolysis alone.

Keynote Forum

Bozena Michniak-Kohn

The Rutgers University of New Jersey
USA

Keynote: Polymeric Nanospheres for Topical Delivery of Adapalene

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Dermatology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bozena Michniak-Kohn photo
Biography:

Dr. Bozena B. Michniak-Kohn is a tenured Professor of Pharmaceutics at the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, and Founder /Director of the Center for Dermal Research CDR at Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ. She is also the Director of the Laboratory for Drug Delivery of the New Jersey Center for Biomaterials (NJCBM). Her main focus is topical, transdermal and buccal drug delivery. Dr. Michniak-Kohn has over 35 years experience in design & optimization of topically applied formulations and transdermal patches. She holds patents for novel drug carrier approaches for dermatologicals. She is a member of graduate programs at Rutgers in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Chemistry and Chemical Biology as well as the RWJ Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Michniak-Kohn received her B. Sc. (Honors) in Pharmacy and Ph.D. in Pharmacology from the U.K. Dr. Michniak-Kohn has directed over 50 Ph.D. and Masters students and the work resulted in over 120 peer-reviewed manuscripts, over 420 abstracts, 2 books, and 35 book chapters. She is a member of 10 journal editorial boards, several scientific advisory boards, and is a reviewer for about 42 pharmaceutical and drug delivery journals. For this work she was awarded Fellow status of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) in 2008.

Abstract:

Introductionrn Hair follicles are considered as alternative pathway for topical and transdermal delivery. They canrncontribute to absorption and uptake of large molecules and nanoparticles. Therefore, nanocarriers can potentially be an effective drug delivery system targeting at hair follicle-related diseases, such as acne and alopecia1. Adapalene is a third generation retinoid and a highly lipophilic drug (logP=8.2), which is commercially available in forms of topical gel and lotion for treatment of mild to moderate acne2. In these commercial products adapalene exists as microcrystals dispersed in the formulations. Skin irritation has been reported with topical adapalene products due to direct contact of adapalene microcrystals containing acid groups (-COOH) with stratum corneum (SC), as well as presence of alcohols and surfactants in the formulation3. We have developed a platform technology to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs in tyrosinederived nanospheres (TyroSphere) and to facilitate skin delivery4. In this study, the applicability of TyroSphere for targeted delivery of adapalene into hair follicles is assessed.rnrnrnExperimental methodsrnrnAdapalene was loaded in the TyroSphere according to a previously reported protocol4 and the finalrnformulation was in form of liquid dispersion or a gel. Adapalene loaded-nanosphere (Ada-TyroSphere)rndispersion were characterized for their particle size, particle morphology, drug-polymer binding efficiency, drug sebum/water and stratum corneum/water partition coefficients, and drug’s crystallinity. Adapalene aqueous solubility was measured in presence of different amount of surfactant and was compared with TyroSphere formulations. HPLC technique was used for all the quantification purposes. Skin distribution of adapalene formulated in TyroSphere (gel and suspension) and marketed lotion (Differin®) was examined on human cadaver and porcine ear skin. Fluorescent microscopy was used to visualize adapalene delivery to epidermis and hair follicles.rnrnResults and discussionrnrnThe average particle size of TyroSphere was approximately 70 nm (PDI<0.22), which is suitable forrnfollicular uptake. TyroSphere provided substantial enhancement in the solubility of adapalene in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) pH=7.4. In X-Ray diffraction diagram, the crystalline peaks of adapalene were absence in Ada-TyroSphere, suggesting absence of adapalene microcrystals. Sebaceous glands are part of pilosebaceous unit and they produce and secrete sebum into follicular orifice. In order to target hair follicles it is critical to understand drug/formulation partition properties into human sebum5. The average partition coefficient of adapalene -in form of Ada-TyroSphere in PBS- into sebum after 15 h was 39.5± 7.1, while this parameter for SC partitioning was 18.6±1.5.rnFollowing 12 h application of 0.5 ml Ada-TyroSphere aqueous dispersion (0.02% drug w/w) onrndermatomed human cadaver skin, adapalene extracted from epidermis was measured as 3.43±1.14 g/cm2, while 100 mg Differin® lotion (0.1% drug w/w) delivered 1.25±1.28 μg/cm2 of drug into the epidermis (n=8). Moreover, results of another permeation study on porcine skin showed that there was no significance difference in delivery of adapalene to SC among Ada-TyroSphere gel formulations (0.025 % drug w/w) and Differin® (0.1% drug w/w). Figure 1 depicts fluorescent images of porcine skin treated topically with Ada-TyroSphere for 24 h (blue fluorescence coming from adapalene). Clearly, adapalene was delivered to upper epidermal layers and hair follicles.rn

Keynote Forum

Iona Weir

Decima Health Ltd, Auckland
New Zealand

Keynote: AtopisTM for the treatment of mild to moderate eczema

Time : 10:45-11:15

OMICS International Dermatology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Iona Weir  photo
Biography:

Iona Weir completed her PhD at Auckland University and a sabbatical at the Ontario Cancer Institute. After 12 years as a Senior Scientist at Plant and Food Research Institute in New Zealand, she moved into the private sector where for the last 15 years, she was CSO and Director for several companies including BioDiscovery NZ Ltd, Lypanosys and Vital Food Processors Ltd. She is the co-founder and CEO of Decima Health Ltd, a New Zealand natural products biotechnology R&D company. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has 4 patents granted.

Abstract:

AtopisTM, a topical natural cream, which has been developed to reduce the appearance and symptoms of eczema, a common inflammatory skin disease. AtopisTM contains MyriphytaseTM extract which modulates the skin immune system by regulating IL-10, IL-17 and TNF-α cytokines. MyriphytaseTM contains peptilipidsTM and isomeric flavonoids which have antimicrobial, erythema, pruritus and wound healing properties.rnTwo clinical trials have been successfully completed on AtopisTM, the first an open-label pilot study of 20 subjects (Weir et al., 2016) and the second a double blinded placebo controlled clinical trial with 61 subjects. Both clinical trials recruited healthy subjects aged 18-75 years with mild to moderate eczema, which was determined at screening. Subjects topically applied AtopisTM twice daily for 30 days on areas identified with skin lesions, and were followed to evaluate the efficacy of the AtopisTM in reducing the appearance of eczema lesions and reducing the symptoms of itching, scaling, and erythema.rnDermatological assessments for severity and size of lesions, and Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) demonstrated statistically significant reductions from baseline (20.61) to Day 30 (10.26) (P < 0.04) for the open label study. For the double blinded placebo controlled clinical trial, significant reductions from baseline (28.1) to Day 28 (17.5) for AtopisTM versus the placebo baseline (28.4) to (22.6) Day 28 (P < 0.037) were also found. Topical application of AtopisTM is effective for the treatment of mild to moderate eczema as it significantly reduced the appearance of lesions as well as symptoms associated including pruritis, scaling, and erythema. rn