Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th International Conference on Clinical and Experimental Dermatology Chicago,Illinois, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Ayman El-Attar

American Aesthetic Association
USA

Keynote: The TOPAL technique 10 years of experience

Time : 09:30-10:00

OMICS International Dermatology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ayman El-Attar photo
Biography:

Ayman El-Attar is the President of the American Aesthetic Association. He has Founded Derma Laser Centers of New Jersey established in October 2002. He has graduated from Alexandria Medical School with honors in 1987. He has completed residencies in both General Surgery and Family Medicine and obtained a Masters degree of Surgery in 1992. He was an Assistant Lecturer of Surgery at Alexandria University and a Visiting Instructor of Surgery at the Medical College of Ohio. He has finalized his PhD thesis in 1998

Abstract:

The TOPAL technique combines the best of use of safe in-office tumescent technique, the PAL system by MicroAire and using laser lipolysis device at the end of the procedure. Laser lipolysis first approved in the USA in 2006 had their inherent limitation on the amount of fat that can be removed in one session making more physicians skeptical about their efficacy as a standalone tool for patient seeking liposuction. After tumescent anesthesia, the technique achieves dramatic results by debulking that fat using the PAL system, then delivering Nd:YAG laser energy through the small skin entry to heat the fatty deposits and the skin up to 42o C. After performing over five thousand procedures utilizing TOPAL™ our patient satisfaction rate is 97% and our touch up rate is 3%. Both much better figures than those for traditional liposuction or laser assisted lipolysis alone.

Keynote Forum

Bozena Michniak-Kohn

The Rutgers University of New Jersey
USA

Keynote: Polymeric Nanospheres for Topical Delivery of Adapalene

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Dermatology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bozena Michniak-Kohn photo
Biography:

Dr. Bozena B. Michniak-Kohn is a tenured Professor of Pharmaceutics at the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, and Founder /Director of the Center for Dermal Research CDR at Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ. She is also the Director of the Laboratory for Drug Delivery of the New Jersey Center for Biomaterials (NJCBM). Her main focus is topical, transdermal and buccal drug delivery. Dr. Michniak-Kohn has over 35 years experience in design & optimization of topically applied formulations and transdermal patches. She holds patents for novel drug carrier approaches for dermatologicals. She is a member of graduate programs at Rutgers in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Chemistry and Chemical Biology as well as the RWJ Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Michniak-Kohn received her B. Sc. (Honors) in Pharmacy and Ph.D. in Pharmacology from the U.K. Dr. Michniak-Kohn has directed over 50 Ph.D. and Masters students and the work resulted in over 120 peer-reviewed manuscripts, over 420 abstracts, 2 books, and 35 book chapters. She is a member of 10 journal editorial boards, several scientific advisory boards, and is a reviewer for about 42 pharmaceutical and drug delivery journals. For this work she was awarded Fellow status of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) in 2008.

Abstract:

Introductionrn Hair follicles are considered as alternative pathway for topical and transdermal delivery. They canrncontribute to absorption and uptake of large molecules and nanoparticles. Therefore, nanocarriers can potentially be an effective drug delivery system targeting at hair follicle-related diseases, such as acne and alopecia1. Adapalene is a third generation retinoid and a highly lipophilic drug (logP=8.2), which is commercially available in forms of topical gel and lotion for treatment of mild to moderate acne2. In these commercial products adapalene exists as microcrystals dispersed in the formulations. Skin irritation has been reported with topical adapalene products due to direct contact of adapalene microcrystals containing acid groups (-COOH) with stratum corneum (SC), as well as presence of alcohols and surfactants in the formulation3. We have developed a platform technology to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs in tyrosinederived nanospheres (TyroSphere) and to facilitate skin delivery4. In this study, the applicability of TyroSphere for targeted delivery of adapalene into hair follicles is assessed.rnrnrnExperimental methodsrnrnAdapalene was loaded in the TyroSphere according to a previously reported protocol4 and the finalrnformulation was in form of liquid dispersion or a gel. Adapalene loaded-nanosphere (Ada-TyroSphere)rndispersion were characterized for their particle size, particle morphology, drug-polymer binding efficiency, drug sebum/water and stratum corneum/water partition coefficients, and drug’s crystallinity. Adapalene aqueous solubility was measured in presence of different amount of surfactant and was compared with TyroSphere formulations. HPLC technique was used for all the quantification purposes. Skin distribution of adapalene formulated in TyroSphere (gel and suspension) and marketed lotion (Differin®) was examined on human cadaver and porcine ear skin. Fluorescent microscopy was used to visualize adapalene delivery to epidermis and hair follicles.rnrnResults and discussionrnrnThe average particle size of TyroSphere was approximately 70 nm (PDI<0.22), which is suitable forrnfollicular uptake. TyroSphere provided substantial enhancement in the solubility of adapalene in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) pH=7.4. In X-Ray diffraction diagram, the crystalline peaks of adapalene were absence in Ada-TyroSphere, suggesting absence of adapalene microcrystals. Sebaceous glands are part of pilosebaceous unit and they produce and secrete sebum into follicular orifice. In order to target hair follicles it is critical to understand drug/formulation partition properties into human sebum5. The average partition coefficient of adapalene -in form of Ada-TyroSphere in PBS- into sebum after 15 h was 39.5± 7.1, while this parameter for SC partitioning was 18.6±1.5.rnFollowing 12 h application of 0.5 ml Ada-TyroSphere aqueous dispersion (0.02% drug w/w) onrndermatomed human cadaver skin, adapalene extracted from epidermis was measured as 3.43±1.14 g/cm2, while 100 mg Differin® lotion (0.1% drug w/w) delivered 1.25±1.28 μg/cm2 of drug into the epidermis (n=8). Moreover, results of another permeation study on porcine skin showed that there was no significance difference in delivery of adapalene to SC among Ada-TyroSphere gel formulations (0.025 % drug w/w) and Differin® (0.1% drug w/w). Figure 1 depicts fluorescent images of porcine skin treated topically with Ada-TyroSphere for 24 h (blue fluorescence coming from adapalene). Clearly, adapalene was delivered to upper epidermal layers and hair follicles.rn

Keynote Forum

Iona Weir

Decima Health Ltd, Auckland
New Zealand

Keynote: AtopisTM for the treatment of mild to moderate eczema

Time : 10:45-11:15

OMICS International Dermatology 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Iona Weir  photo
Biography:

Iona Weir completed her PhD at Auckland University and a sabbatical at the Ontario Cancer Institute. After 12 years as a Senior Scientist at Plant and Food Research Institute in New Zealand, she moved into the private sector where for the last 15 years, she was CSO and Director for several companies including BioDiscovery NZ Ltd, Lypanosys and Vital Food Processors Ltd. She is the co-founder and CEO of Decima Health Ltd, a New Zealand natural products biotechnology R&D company. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has 4 patents granted.

Abstract:

AtopisTM, a topical natural cream, which has been developed to reduce the appearance and symptoms of eczema, a common inflammatory skin disease. AtopisTM contains MyriphytaseTM extract which modulates the skin immune system by regulating IL-10, IL-17 and TNF-α cytokines. MyriphytaseTM contains peptilipidsTM and isomeric flavonoids which have antimicrobial, erythema, pruritus and wound healing properties.rnTwo clinical trials have been successfully completed on AtopisTM, the first an open-label pilot study of 20 subjects (Weir et al., 2016) and the second a double blinded placebo controlled clinical trial with 61 subjects. Both clinical trials recruited healthy subjects aged 18-75 years with mild to moderate eczema, which was determined at screening. Subjects topically applied AtopisTM twice daily for 30 days on areas identified with skin lesions, and were followed to evaluate the efficacy of the AtopisTM in reducing the appearance of eczema lesions and reducing the symptoms of itching, scaling, and erythema.rnDermatological assessments for severity and size of lesions, and Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) demonstrated statistically significant reductions from baseline (20.61) to Day 30 (10.26) (P < 0.04) for the open label study. For the double blinded placebo controlled clinical trial, significant reductions from baseline (28.1) to Day 28 (17.5) for AtopisTM versus the placebo baseline (28.4) to (22.6) Day 28 (P < 0.037) were also found. Topical application of AtopisTM is effective for the treatment of mild to moderate eczema as it significantly reduced the appearance of lesions as well as symptoms associated including pruritis, scaling, and erythema. rn

  • Track 1: Dermatological Diseases
    Track 2: Aesthetic Dermatology
Location: Vienna
Speaker

Chair

Omeed Memar

Northwestern University School of Medicine
USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Eric Huang

University of California
USA

Session Introduction

Omeed Memar

Northwestern University
USA

Title: Low level laser treatment for hair loss

Time : 11:15-11:35

Speaker
Biography:

Omeed Memar has completed his MD and PhD at the University of Texas and Dermatology Residency at University of Illinois School of Medicine. He is a premier hair transplant Surgeon. He has published many papers in reputed journals, patented numerous inventions and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

Male pattern androgenetic alopecia (AAl) and female pattern hair loss (FPHL) are chronic conditions which causes social and psychological distress. In AAl hair recedes bilaterally from the anterior to posterior scalp and the vertex, while in FHPL hair thins diffusely on the entire crown and then sides without anterior receding . The treatment options are limited. One option is Low Level Laser Therapy. Here, I will review Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT), which emits a monochromatic and coherent beam in the red or near infrared wavelength. The logic behind the use of LLLT comes from observation of paradoxical hypertrichosis while attempting laser hair removal, especially in skin color. The mechanism of this is unknown.

Eric Huang

University of California
USA

Title: Precision skin microbiome using skin probiotic bacteria against pathogens

Time : 11:35-11:55

Speaker
Biography:

Eric Huang has been an Assistant Professor at Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama, Birmingham for four years. He is currently a Professor at Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Diego. In the past nine years at UCSD, his research focuses on the development of vaccines and probiotics for treatments of various skin diseases including acne vulgaris and S. aureus infection. His results demonstrate that carbohydrate fermentation of the human skin microbiome functions as the innate immunity against pathogens. Many skin probiotic bacteria have been isolated in his lab and developed as bacteriotherapy for treatments of skin disorders.

Abstract:

Microbial imbalance with the over-growth of microbes in the human skin microbiome is termed “skin dysbiosis”. We have demonstrated that many skin (probiotic) bacteria in the human skin can exploit the skin endogenous carbohydrates to undergo fermentation and produce short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) to rein in the over-growth of microbes in the skin. Our approach here is to selectively amplify the fermentation activity of probiotic bacteria to rebalance the skin dysbiosis. Various selective fermentation initiator (SFIs) including carbohydrate analogs have been used to exclusively trigger the fermentation of skin probiotic bacteria. The concept of using SFIs to enhance the probiotic activity of skin bacteria against pathogens will be applied for development of post-antibiotic adjuvant therapy for treatment of skin disorders. Two disease models Acne vulgaris and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection] are used to test the efficacy of SFIs. We envision that precision microbiome approaches using SFIs are able to specifically intensify the probiotic ability of skin bacteria, produce SCFAs to “beat” out its pathogen competitors and reduce inflammation via the inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC). The SFIs will be developed as “antibiotic adjuvants” and tested their ability to reduce the effective dose of topical antibiotics for treatment of skin disorders and minimize the non-specific killing effect of antibiotics on skin commensals. When successful, SFIs will be the first antibiotic adjuvants that are designed based on natural strategy (fermentation) of human skin commensals.

Reza F Ghohestani

Texas Institute of Dermatology, USA

Title: Workshop on Challenging cases in RheumDerm

Time : 11:55-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Reza Fredrick Ghohestani completed his Internship in Surgery at Penn and Derm residency at Thomas Jefferson University. He received his Master’s in Cutaneous Biology & Pharmacology and PhD in Skin Immunobiology from Claude Bernard University, Lyon. Dr. Ghohestani served as the principle Investigator and team leader for many years at various Academic Institutes. He is a former chief of dermatology of University of Texas and Editor of European Journal of Dermatology. Dr. Ghohestani outstanding work and dedication to excellence have earned him numerous honors and international awards for his dermatology research including the American Skin Assoc. & Derm Found Awards. Dr. Ghohestani is director of Texas Institute of Dermatology.

Abstract:

Many diseases initially present with skin manifestations and may often have an overlap with rheumatologic symptoms and diseases. Patients who have cutaneous features of autoimmune and connective tissue diseases have been a challenge for both Dermatologists and Rheumatologists. Selected challenging cases with combined Dermatologic and Rheumatologic manifestations will be presented and different aspects of diagnosis, natural course and treatment will be discussed.

Farrokh Khosravi

Texas Institute of Dermatology
USA

Title: Workshop on Challenging cases in RheumDerm

Time : 11:55-12:55

Speaker
Biography:

Farrokh Khosravi has completed his Fellowship of Rheumatology in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. He is a part time Assistant Professor of Medicine. His field of interest is autoimmune skin diseases and he has published papers in the field of Behcet's disease and Multicentric Reticulohistiocytosis in reputed journals and served as a Reviewer for Journal of Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences and Rheumatology Research Journal.

Abstract:

Many diseases initially present with skin manifestations and may often have an overlap with rheumatologic symptoms and diseases. Patients who have cutaneous features of autoimmune and connective tissue diseases have been a challenge for both Dermatologists and Rheumatologists. Selected challenging cases with combined Dermatologic and Rheumatologic manifestations will be presented and different aspects of diagnosis, natural course and treatment will be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Sammy Francis Murday has graduated from Heinrich-Heine-University Medical School in Duesseldorf, Germany. During his studies he was a Scholarship Student at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg and Tongji Medical School, Shanghai. He is a Dermatologist in the Department of Dermatology at Klinikum Dortmund; a Teaching Hospital of University of Muenster and works in the field of laser medicine

Abstract:

Evidence based medicine is the process of systematically reviewing, evaluating and using clinical research findings to aid the delivery of best clinical care to patients. Over the past decades lasers became very popular in the field of aesthetic medicine and many approaches are available. Although the numbers of treated patients and indications to treat are high; the number of valuable clinical studies is limited. To decipher the different levels of evidence available for laser treatments, we performed an analysis of current studies and reviews. Since there are many aesthetic indications for laser treatment we focused on the distinct field of hair removal and searched for data from the Chochrane library, PubMed and Medline. Photoepilation is approximately one of the most common medical applications of Laser medicine and has a big economical impact. The use of lasers for hair removal has been approved by FDA in 1996. Until today about 21 randomized controlled trials and five systematic reviews are published. Although randomization processes and presentation of methods are mainly poor and follow-ups are short in time best evidence can be stated for the diode and alexandrite lasers followed by Nd:YAG lasers and IPL. Nevertheless there is no satisfying evidence for permanent hair removal but only for hair reduction. Further high quality studies are required to improve the levels of evidence. In the future EBM could help to communicate expectations and outcomes with patients. Thereby patient dissatisfaction, side effects and malpractice could be reduced

Speaker
Biography:

Sevil Alan has received her PhD from Ege University, Turkey during the period of 1993-1999. She completed her Dermatology Residency at the Adana Numune Education and Research Hospital in Adana, Turkey. Currently, she is working as a Dermatologist in Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Turkey. She is a member of editorial board of journals like SM Dermatology, Dermatology & Pigmentation Disorders, and International Journal of Clinical Dermatology & Research (IJCDR). She is serving as a Reviewer for journals like JAMA Dermatology, International Research Journal of Public and Environmental Health, International Medical Journal of Sifa University. She has authored many research articles.

Abstract:

GDF-15 (Growth Differentiation Factor-15)/ Macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1) is a member of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily. TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein/growth differentiation factor family proteins are important regulators of cellular physiological processes, including cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. GDF-15 is has been reported to exhibit both tumorigenic and antitumorigenic activities. GDF-15 is regulated by p53 and highly expressed in melanoma cells. Furthermore GDF-15 is associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and histamine-induced melanogenesis. Some studies showed that GDF-15 level is increased in patients with systemic sclerosis and is related with the extent of skin sclerosis. Therefore measurement of serum GDF-15 may be useful for risk stratification in early disease stage. In the future, GDF-15/MIC-1 may be suitable for development as a serum diagnostic and is a possible target for the treatment of benign and malign skin diseases.

Speaker
Biography:

Arpi Avetisyan is a Research Associate at Nairian CJSC; an Armenia based all natural cosmetics manufacturer. Her primary responsibility in the company is technology development for production and scientific research in the field of herbal cosmetics. She is interested in safe use of various herbs and essential oils to address diverse cosmetology issues. Before joining Nairian CJSC, she was a Researcher at the Institute of Chemical Physics of NAS of Republic of Armenia. She has obtained her MS degree in Chemistry from Yerevan State University, Yerevan, Armenia.

Abstract:

Several components of essential oil distilled from the flowers of Rosa damascene Mill L, were reported to have anti-bacterial, antioxidant and relaxant properties. This is the reason why, apart from the fragrance industry, this oil is being widely used in cosmetics and pharmacopeia. As with any essential oil, the content and composition of it can change significantly, depending on the cultivation methods and terroir. The purpose of this research is to determine the chemical composition and to test biological activities of essential oil distilled from damask rose flowers cultivated in Armenia at an exceptionally high elevation of 1600 m above sea level. The essential oil was obtained by hydro-distillation method in a Clevenger type apparatus and its chemical composition was determined by HP GC-MS setup. As a result of analysis, the main compounds of obtained essential oil were determined to be citronellol (22.28%), nonadecane (15.09%), caryophyllene (10.82%), heneicosane (9.21%), farnesol (6.34%) and citral (6.15%). The antioxidant activity of the essential oil samples was measured through conducting DPPH assay. Minimal inhibition concentrations for both microbiological and anti-fungal properties were measured using the same agar diffusion method. The amount of this oil that can be safely used in cosmetic products was evaluated according to dermal maximum values for its constituents according to "Essential Oils Safety".

  • Track 3: Skin Infection
    Track 4: Dermatological Oncology
Location: Vienna
Speaker

Chair

Iona Weir

Decima Health Ltd
New Zealand

Speaker

Co-Chair

Andrew Leask

University of Western Ontario
Canada

Session Introduction

Farah Rukhsana Abdulla

University of Chicago
USA

Title: The association of Staphylococcus aureus and mycosis fungoides/Sezary syndrome

Time : 14:20-14:40

Speaker
Biography:

Farah Rukhsana Abdulla has completed her MD from Northeastern Ohio Medical University, Dermatology Residency and Dermatopathology Fellowship at the University of Cincinnati, Cutaneous Lymphoma Fellowship at Stanford University School of Medicine and a Science and Technology Policy Fellowship with the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is the Director of the Cutaneous Lymphoma Clinic at the University of Chicago.

Abstract:

Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sezary Syndrome (SS) are the two most common types of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. They are both neoplastic diseases with the phenotype of a T-helper cell, expressing CD4+ and CD45RO+. The classic presentation of MF is patches and plaques on the skin that can evolve into tumors with visceral involvement being rare. Sezary syndrome generally presents with erythroderma, significant blood involvement and lymphadenopathy. While MF is an indolent disease in its early stages, histologic transformation to a large cell subtype (t-MF) is associated with an aggressive clinical course resulting in shortened survival as is Sezary Syndrome. However, due to the compromised skin barrier associated with erythroderma in general, infection is the leading cause of death rather than increased tumor burden. The most common infection is Staphylococcus aureus. However, not all causes of erythroderma are associated with an increased risk of infection. In particular, MF/SS has a TH2 cytokine profile and thus is associated with a decrease in antimicrobial peptides predisposing patients to Staphylococcus aureus colonization as seen in atopic dermatitis. While this bacterium is accepted as a dangerous pathogen in patients with CTCL, its role in causing T-cell expansion is not well accepted. Staphylococcal sepsis and colonization of the skin are associated with disease progression, including worsening erythroderma as well as pruritus, increased white blood cell counts and high lactate dehydrogenase. Staphylococal enterotoxins may not only take advantage of the compromised immune barrier but stimulate the immune dysregulation leading to worsening disease as well.

Speaker
Biography:

Andrew Leask has completed his BSc from the University of British Columbia and PhD from the University of Chicago and Postdoctoral studies from Stanford University School of Medicine. He was a Staff Scientist at FibroGen and University College London. He has published more than 130 peer reviewed journals, has an h factor of 47 and is Managing Editor of Journal of Cell Communication and Signaling and the Editorial Board Member of several other journals.

Abstract:

Melanoma, the second most common invasive cancer in young adults, is highly metastatic: ~5% of patients diagnosed with metastatic melanoma survive for 5 years after diagnosis. 40-60% of all cutaneous melanoma patients possess mutations in BRAF; in these patients, tumors shrink in response to the BRAF inhibitors. However, patients develop resistance to these drugs, necessitating the development of alternative therapeutic targets. The matricellular protein connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) is overexpressed in melanoma; however, how CCN2 contributes to melanoma progression is unclear. Herein, we use melanoma cell lines and mice in which CCN2 is deleted in the tumor stroma to demonstrate that loss of CCN2 in the tumor microenvironment impedes melanoma invasion. Specifically, loss of CCN2 in melanoma cells diminished their ability to invade through collagen in vitro and loss of fibroblast derived CCN2 decreased metastases of melanoma cells from the skin to the lungs in vivo. CCN2 deficient B16(F10) cells showed reduced expression of periostin; addition of recombinant periostin rescued the in vitro invasion defect of these cells. Analysis of CCN2 deficient mice confirmed loss of periostin expression in the absence of CCN2. CCN2 and periostin mRNA levels are positively correlated with each other and with the stromal composition of human melanoma lesions but not BRAF mutations. These results are consistent with the idea that metastatic ability results from CCN2 mediated interactions between tumor cells and the stroma. CCN2 promotes invasion and metastasis via periostin and should be further evaluated as a possible therapeutic target for BRAF inhibitor-resistant melanoma.

Maurice Efana Asuquo

University of Calabar
Nigeria

Title: Squamous cell carcinoma in a tropical setting

Time : 15:00-15:20

Speaker
Biography:

Maurice Efana Asuquo is a Professor/Chief Consultant Surgeon at the University of Calabar, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, (UCTH), Nigeria. He has served as the Head of Department of Surgery, University of Calabar, Dean, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry and Provost College of Medical Sciences. His major research interest is dermatological oncology. He is currently the Head of the Oncology unit of UCTH, Nigeria. He has attended several international and local conferences, presented several papers on dermatological oncology. He has over 80 publications to his credit.

Abstract:

Background: In Sub-Saharan Africa, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is reported to be commoner than other skin malignancies. This is in sharp contrast with the experience in North America and Europe where basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is reported to be the commonest skin cancer. The risk factors vary with geographic region and race. This study sought to evaluate the current pattern, possible risk factors and management outcomes in the authors setting and proffer solutions improved outcomes. Method: Patients who presented with histologic diagnosis of SCC at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, (UCTH), Calabar, Nigeria from 2013 to 2015 were prospectively studied and compared with total number of patient with skin malignancies seen over the same period. Results: In total, 10 patients (4 male, 6 female; M:F ratio 1:1.5) whose ages ranged from 7-65 years (mean 43.7 years) were seen. They comprised 47.6% of total skin malignancy seen in the study period. Nine (90%) were darkly pigmented while one patient was an albino. Three (30%) patients presented with Marjolin’s ulcer (MU) affecting the limbs (1 upper, 2 lower limb) while 7 (70%) were non Marjolin’s. In the later subset, the albino presented with multiple lesions (left post auricular and upper back). Three (30%) patients all females presented with anal cancers. The youngest patient aged 7 years presented with auricular polyp. The other 2 (20%) patients presented with scalp ulcers. All the patients with MU were due to chronic traumatic ulcers; their ages ranged from 27-55 years (mean 45.3 years). The latency period was from 6-11 years (mean 8.3 years). Patients were offered a combination of surgery (excision, skin grafting/flaps and amputation), chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The outcomes were poor due to advanced primary lesions at presentation with one hospital mortality in a patient with an extensive scalp ulcer. Conclusion: The clinical pattern of SCC in our setting revealed that patients were in 2 subsets: Marjolin’s and non Marjolin’s. The risk factor in the MU group appears to be chronic traumatic ulcer. In the non Marjolin’s group, solar radiation was attributed to be the risk factor in the albino patient while others were non-solar. Socio-cultural beliefs, ignorance and poverty were remarkable underlying issues. Education highlighting the possible risk factors, early presentation, diagnosis and treatment will improve outcomes with a decrease in the health care cost of SCC.

Speaker
Biography:

Arpi Avetisyan is a Research Associate at Nairian CJSC; an Armenia based all natural cosmetics manufacturer. Her primary responsibility in the company is technology development for production and scientific research in the field of herbal cosmetics. She is interested in safe use of various herbs and essential oils to address diverse cosmetology issues. Before joining Nairian CJSC, she was a Researcher at the Institute of Chemical Physics of NAS of Republic of Armenia. She has obtained her MS degree in Chemistry from Yerevan State University, Yerevan, Armenia.

Abstract:

Several components of essential oil distilled from the flowers of Rosa damascene Mill L, were reported to have anti-bacterial, antioxidant and relaxant properties. This is the reason why, apart from the fragrance industry, this oil is being widely used in cosmetics and pharmacopeia. As with any essential oil, the content and composition of it can change significantly, depending on the cultivation methods and terroir. The purpose of this research is to determine the chemical composition and to test biological activities of essential oil distilled from damask rose flowers cultivated in Armenia at an exceptionally high elevation of 1600 m above sea level. The essential oil was obtained by hydro-distillation method in a Clevenger type apparatus and its chemical composition was determined by HP GC-MS setup. As a result of analysis, the main compounds of obtained essential oil were determined to be citronellol (22.28%), nonadecane (15.09%), caryophyllene (10.82%), heneicosane (9.21%), farnesol (6.34%) and citral (6.15%). The antioxidant activity of the essential oil samples was measured through conducting DPPH assay. Minimal inhibition concentrations for both microbiological and anti-fungal properties were measured using the same agar diffusion method. The amount of this oil that can be safely used in cosmetic products was evaluated according to dermal maximum values for its constituents according to "Essential Oils Safety".

Sowmya Naga Dogiparthi

Chettinad Health City
India

Title: Cutaneous manifestations of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

Time : 15:55-16:15

Speaker
Biography:

Sowmya Naga Dogiparthi has completed her MBBS and MD in Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprosy in 2014 from Sri Ramachandra Medical University, India. She worked as Junior Resident in Department of Endocrinology at SRU. She has completed a degree in Cosmetelogy from Stanley Medical College & Hospital and holds a Diploma in Fellowship in Aesthetic Medicine from Institute of Laser and Aesthetic Medicine, India. She presented multiple posters and oral presentations in the field of Dermatology and has one national publication.

Abstract:

There is a rise in number of people diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetes is a common manifestation in modern Indian society because of industrial development and drastically changing lifestyles. Diabetic neuropathies are microvascular disorders that are associated with diabetes mellitus. Among the various forms of diabetic neuropathy, the most common is diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The disease if neglected leads to chronic manifestations of ulcer formation and finally leading to amputations. Hence the aim of this study is to document these cutaneous changes and create an early awareness in the importance of controlling diabetes. The study consisted of 205 patients with type 2 DM. Participant’s neuropathy status was determined based on Neuropathy Disability Score and Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom Score (DNSS). 112 (55%) patients with severe DNSS. 101 (49%) patients with moderate Neuropathy Disability Score (NDS) and 75 (37%) with severe NDS. Among the skin changes documented, the common changes seen in the patients are: Peripheral hair loss in 185 (90.2%), xerosis in 168 (82%), anhydrosis in 162 (79%), plantar fissures in 136 (66.3%), ulcer in 80 (39%), among ulcers, the common presentation of Grade-1 (superficial ulcers-55 (26.8%), callus in 73 (35.6%), previous ulcers in 36 (17.6%) patients. Common nail changes documented were onychomycosis in 165 (80.5%) and onychauxis in 53 (25.8%) patients. The other parameters documented were anatomical foot changes, type of foot wear and working nature of the participants. In conclusion, it is important to control glycemic levels in the initial stages of diabetes.

Speaker
Biography:

Ujjwala Kulkarni is currently pursuing her PhD in reputed medical school in Mumbai. She has completed Master in Pharmacology from Baroda Medical College affiliated to M.S. University, Gujarat. She has worked as a Lecturer in Department of Pharmacology for 7 years and taught basic pharmacology to undergraduate medical student. She also got GSMC Regional Fellowship in Foundation of Advance Instruction in Medical Education and Research (FAIMER Fellowship) for innovative project in medical education. She also has a experience in BA/BE study. She published 7 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a chronic skin disorder with no cure. Very few studies have been published to reflect the impact of established pharmacotherapy on psoriasis patients, perception as well as satisfaction with the treatment in India. METHODS: The present study intended to find out the quality of life of chronic plaque psoriasis patients, using psoriasis disability index (PDI) and to find out the patient satisfaction towards the given pharmacotherapy, using a pre-validated structured patient satisfaction questionnaire. The study was initiated in the Department of Dermatology after taking a permission from the Institutional Ethics Committee, for a period of one and a half years. Patients (n=72) were enrolled after taking a written informed consent. Demographic data were collected. Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) scores were calculated to grade the clinical severity of psoriasis in the patients. Two different questionnaires viz., Psoriasis disability index (PDI) to evaluate the quality of life and a pre-validated and structured patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ) to evaluate the satisfaction of the patients towards the given treatment were used. RESULTS: 50% of the psoriatic patients on treatment showed overall satisfaction towards the given treatment. 24% wanted a change in their current therapy. The correlations of PDI with PASI and PSQ with PASI were analysed by Spearman rank test. The PASI is moderately correlated with daily activity (r=0.43, p<0.0001), personal relation (r=0.47, p<0.001), leisure (r=0.44, p<0.0001) and weakly correlated with treatment (0.22, 0.02). The total PDI and PASI scores are strongly correlated with each other (r=0.76, p<0.0001). The PSQ did not show any correlation with PDI and PASI. CONCLUSION: 50% patients remained dissatisfied with the treatment as their quality of life did not improve. Therefore, psoriasis should be treated with a holistic and integrative approach by the physician along with frequent patient counselling. PSQ showed no