Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 23 rd Asia-Pacific Dermatology Conference Osaka, Japan.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Danka Svecova

Comenius University, Slovakia

Keynote: Anti-IL-17 nanobody: A future option in treatment of psoriasis

Time : 09:00-09:40

OMICS International Dermatology Conference 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Danka Svecova photo
Biography:

Danka Svecova is presently a Professor of Dermatovenerology, Head of Bullous Disorders Unit, Department of Dermatovenerology, University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Slovakia. She is a Board Member of Committee for Dermatovenerology and Immunology dissertation for PhD at Comenius University and a Member of Committee for Probation of Specialization for Dermatovenerology at Comenius University and University of JP Safarik in Kosice. She has participated in research on Skin Allergology and Immunology under the supervision of Professor Akira Ohkawara at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan. She wrote two monographs about blistering disorders-Pemphigus vulgaris autoimmune disease and Pemphigus.

Abstract:

An improved understanding of the pathogenesis of psoriasis has led to the development of multiple new potential targets for therapy. The first pathway targeted by new biologics focus on the p40 subunit that is shared by interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23. Second new strategy focuses IL-17 or its receptor. Secukinumab is fully human monoclonal G1k antibody targeting IL-17A, approved in EU for the first-line systemic therapy of moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis. New IL-17 inhibitors, Ixekizumab and Brodalumab achieved very good efficacy and are currently in administration approved review. We demonstrate the preliminary results of the anti-IL-17 A/F bispecific nanobody that neutralize the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-17A and IL-17F. We present results of multicentric, phase I, randomized, double -blind, placebo controlled study investigated multiple ascending doses of anti-IL-17 A/F nanobody (M1095) in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Body surface area (BSA) ≥10%, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) ≥12 and static Physician’s Global Assessment (sPGA) ≥3 were evaluated. Patients received 30, 60, 120 or 240 mg anti-IL-17 A/F nanobody or placebo every two weeks subcutaneously for 6 weeks. Primary endpoints were safety, tolerability, immunogenicity and pharmacokinetics. Secondary endpoints were pharmacodynamics, efficacy and histological analysis. On day 85, 6 weeks after the last dose of the drug, PASI 75 was achieved in 7/8 patients (88%) receiving 30 or 60 mg, 8/8 (100%) receiving 120 mg and 9/9 (100%) receiving 240 mg of drug. PASI 90 was achieved in 4/8 (50%), 7/8 (88%) and 9/9 (100%) patients receiving 30 mg, 60 mg, 120 mg or 240 mg, respectively. PASI 100 was achieved in 1/8 (13%), 2/8 (25%), 4/8 (50%) and 5/9 (56%) patients receiving 30 mg, 60 mg, 120 mg or 240 mg, respectively. Improved PASI scores were seen 7 days post-first dose in all 4 cohorts. Biopsy assessment of skin lesion showed complete reversal of disease pathology in majority of patients in high dose groups. Conclusion can be drawn that Anti-IL-17 A/F bispecific nanobody presents a new treatment option well tolerated and effective in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis associated with skin clearance improvement in all indices of psoriasis studied.

Keynote Forum

Tingsong Lim

Clique Clinic, Malaysia

Keynote: The facial overfilled syndrome

Time : 09:40-10:20

OMICS International Dermatology Conference 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tingsong Lim photo
Biography:

Dr Tingsong Lim Medical Director of Clique Clinic Dr Tingsong Lim has actively involved in many academic research and training in Asian facial and body aesthetics, clinical application of fillers’ rheology, facial overfilled syndrome, pigmentary disorders, laser medicine and regenerative medicine. Graduated from Tohoku University School of Medicine under the Monbusho Scholarship, Dr Lim speaks 4 languages (English, Mandarin, Malay, Japanese) fluently, and has been a frequent speaker and trainer regionally and internationally. Medical Director of Clique Clinic, Dr Lim has a private practice in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Abstract:

As dermal fillers became more widely acceptable, we started to observe increasing numbers of people developing facial overfilled syndrome. These overfilled faces are commonly seen among those who have undergone multiple filler injections. The overfilled syndrome can be seen among those who had volume overload in the mid face, forehead, chin and nose. Incorrectly placed dermal fillers, poor selection of filler products, overzealous attempts by the injectors and overly enthusiastic clients who chase the lines are the common cause of this phenomenon. Many of those who have overfilled syndrome lost their original facial topography and may or may not be aware of such condition. The facial distortion can be exaggerated by facial expressions and movements. Overfilled syndrome is more commonly produced by practitioners depending solely on a single modality for treatment. Overfilled syndrome is commonly seen after multiple treatments with fillers. This syndrome is under-diagnosed and many practitioners are not aware of such condition. Having the awareness of the overfilled syndrome is crucial among aesthetic practitioners to prevent it from happening. Once a face is overfilled and the structure is distorted, diminishing the volume with hyaluronidase will help to minimize the distortion, but will not necessarily restore the face to its natural look. Therefore, it is very important for the medical aesthetic community to bring up the awareness of overfilled syndrome and prevent this from happening.

  • Ayurvedic Therapy, Dermatological Disease, Pediatric Dermatology, Research in Dermatology

Session Introduction

Lakmali Pathiraja

Ministry of Health, Nutrition & Indigenous Medicine, Sri Lanka

Title: Unraveling secrets of Sri Lankan indigenous medicine

Time : 10:40-11:10

Speaker
Biography:

Lakmali Pathiraja has completed her MD in Dermatology from University of Colombo. She is working as a Consultant Dermatologist in a rural area of her country and serves large number of poor patients in this area. She has done many research studies and given speeches at both local and international conferences and symposia.

Abstract:

Ethnic origin influences the structure of the skin. Similarly, various environmental, cultural and social factors related to ethnicity have a great impact on the skin. People of Indian, Sri Lankan, Pakistani and Malaysian origin belong to dark Asian ethnic skin type. Although, a large proportion of subjects belong to this category, literature is limited except for a few studies that focus on pigmentation. Asian skin is pigmented, has larger sweat glands and is smooth and shows minimal signs of aging, but conversely has weaker barrier function upon chemical or mechanical challenge. Furthermore, they hold higher risk of pigmentary side effects following procedures carried out on their skin. Traditional skin concerns of various ethnic groups will enhance the modern treatment of various skin types. Sri Lankan indigenous medicine has close affinity to Ayurveda, but has its own unique properties. The island has unique pedigrees, which hold ancient medical secrets that are mainly in the form of manuscripts are passed down from generation to generation. Thousands of years of history have made it evident that this system can cure any physical or mental illness. Plant and herbal products have been used for ages for cutaneous treatment, skin care and aesthetic purposes. Sri Lanka has a rich collection of medicinal plants, including many endemic species. Consideration of these factors will enhance the effectiveness of current skin treatments on this particular ethnic skin type.

Mohan Arumugam

National University of Malaysia, Malaysia

Title: Sun exposure, and vitamin D in adult atopic dermatitis: a case-control study

Time : 11:10-11:40

Speaker
Biography:

Mohan Arumugam is currently a lecturer and physician, with the dermatology unit, department of internal medicine, at the National University of Malaysia (Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia).  He completed his post graduate studies in doctor of internal medicine in 2016.  He graduated with a degree in Nutrition and Community Health before pursuing medical studies.  Upon completing medical studies, from Universiti Putra Malaysia, in 2003, he held the positions of medical and health officer and medical officer, in various Malaysian Ministry of Health hospitals.  In 2008, he initiated the dermatology clinic at Hospital Serdang, while serving as a medical officer.  It was this assignment that sparked his interest in dermatology.  His research interests in medicine include: Autoimmune skin disorders; Atopic dermatitis; Immunology in nutrition and medicine.

Abstract:

Introduction: Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is a chronic relapsing skin disease. Lower levels of vitamin D have been associated with severity of atopic dermatitis. Results in previous studies have not been consistent. Factors affecting vitamin D status such as body mass index (BMI) and sun exposure were not always assessed.

Aim & Methodology: It is a case-control study with 38 cases and 38 matched controls to determine the relationship between vitamin D status and AD and the association between sun exposure and dietary intake with vitamin D status. Appropriate selection criteria, blood sampling and validated questionnaire for AD severity, (SCORAD) were used.

Results: 15 (39.5%) mild AD, 17 (44.7%) moderate and 6 (15.8%) severe AD. Serum Vitamin D levels did not correlate with AD severity. Serum Vitamin D was significantly lower in AD [15.9(9.9-24.0) ng/ml] than controls [17.3(14.4-27.2) ng/ml, p=0.028]. There was a statistically significant association between Vitamin D and case-controls. [χ2 (2)=20.041, p<0.001]. Vitamin D was sufficient in 16 (42.1%) AD; 15 (39.5%) controls, insufficient in 7 (18.4%) AD; 22 (57.9%) controls and deficient in 15 (39.5%) AD; 1 (2.6%) control. Sun exposure was similar in both groups. Cases had significantly higher dietary vitamin D intake [1.5(0.6-3.1) vs 0.6 (0.3-1.0) µg]. AD had higher odds for Vitamin D deficiency; OR 17.52 (95% CI: 1.4-212.7; p=0.025). There were statistically significant differences in sun exposure index and serum vitamin D between different ethnic groups and gender, in general.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Molluscum contagiosum is a common skin infection caused by Molluscum contagiosum virus and often occurs in children at school age. The modalities of treatment are many but not a single therapy has consensus approval for the treatment of molluscum contagiosum in children. Mechanical destruction is associated with pain and not tolerated by children. We reported a 9-year-old boy with multiple lesions on his face for 3 months. Dermatology examination demonstrated multiple typical dome-shaped, pearly-white umbilicated papules on infraorbita, nasolabial and forehead region. Histopathology examination showed intracytoplasmic inclusions bodies. Patient was given topical anesthesia to some lesions for 60 minutes, then vaseline to the surrounding skin of the lesions to be treated, followed by 80% TCA application with toothpick applicator until white frost appeared. Patient described only a stinging sensation and generally tolerated the application well. We then advised the parents to apply 10% KOH solution to each remaining lesion twice daily with a cotton-tipped applicator. At a one-month follow-up, we found complete clearance with hypopigmentation of lesions applied with 80% TCA and no changes of lesions applied with 10% KOH solution. Management using TCA is more painful and leaves hypopigmented patch that will resolve in a short time, whereas KOH is safer and painless but takes longer time to treat therefore parents might prefer TCA application due to faster resolution.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Chao Yuan has received her PhD from Université Bourgogne Franche-Comté (UBFC).She is the Principle Investigator of the clinical trials in Skin and Cosmetic Research Department in Shanghai Skin Disease Hospital. She is a Committee Member in Cosmetology group in Chinese Society of Dermatology and also a Committee Member in Allergy Group in Shanghai Medical Association Branch of Allergy. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals in both Chinese and English

Abstract:

The pathogenesis of acne is multifactorial. While the sequence of events involved in acne pathogenesis have not yet been fully established, the strong co-relationship between the presence of acne and growth of the microorganism Propionibacterium acnes has led to suggestions that P. acnes is an important microbial driver for acne. Recent studies have also shown an increased level of Staphylococcus epidermidis co-relating with acne. As reported separately, we have shown that the plant derived monoterpenes of thymol and terpineol act synergistically with cutaneous antimicrobial lipids against a wide range of bacteria. To better understand the impact of thymol and terpineol on acne microbiome, a clinical study was conducted involving 30 acne volunteers aged 18-30 years and 30 healthy volunteers of the same demographic. The acne volunteers were given a facial cleanser containing thymol and terpineol to use twice daily for four weeks, while the healthy volunteers were given a mild facial cleanser. Baseline results showed a change in microbial ecology in acne subjects, with a significant increase of P. acnes and S epidermidis as compared to healthy subjects. Over the 4-week clinical study, acne subjects who used the facial cleanser containing thymol and terpineol demonstrated a reduction in P. acnes and S epidermidis levels and a concurrent reduction in acne counts. These results show that thymol and terpineol can normalize the level of P. acnes and S epidermidis in acne to a state that is closer to health, leading to a reduction in acne symptom.

Rima Tamara

Hasanuddin University, Indonesia

Title: Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis in 11 year’s old child
Biography:

Abstract:

Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. An attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) may occasionally be responsible. The most common manifestation is lung infection, while cutaneous tuberculosis is relatively uncommon and accounts for 1% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The skin may be infected via hematogenous spread, direct inoculation or auto-inoculation. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis is a form one of tuberculosis cutis that has a clinical feature of a typical form of solitary and multiple hyperkeratotic lesion, warts may also form plaques and often being suspect as warts. The diagnosis of clinically against tuberculosis verrucosa cutis is difficult and must be confirmed by histopathology, tuberculin skin test and clinical response to anti-tuberculosis therapy. Reported a case of a child aged 11 years who were diagnosed with tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, confirmed by tuberculin test and acid-fast bacilli culture. Skin biopsy examination results may be considered for tuberculosis verrucosa cutis. Patient is given anti-tuberculosis first category therapy and it showed clinical improvement after treatment.

Biography:

Sumayyah Ismail Alrefaie has completed her MBBS from King Abdulaziz University and presently a Teaching Assistant at Department of Dermatology in King Abdulaziz University Hospital, KSA. She is interested in dermatology researches and presented at local conferences and other published in well-known journals.

Abstract:

Background: Acne vulgaris is a very common disease and several modalities are used to manage the condition. Among those is Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM). This study aims to evaluate the prevalence of CAM usage among acne vulgaris patients and to determine possible factors associated with its adoption over the prescribed modern medicines.

Methods: A cross-sectional survey, conducted during an acne awareness campaign at King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH), in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The survey was conducted between January 21st and 28th 2016.

Results: A total of 658 subjects were interviewed of which 68% were female. 72% reported a positive past-history of acne. The most common acne type described was Comedonal and face was the site most frequently affected (90.7%). Among all acne sufferers, 77% admitted using CAM. Honey was the most common CAM type used by 53.4%, followed by yogurt (43.4%). Both gender and past history of side effects to medical treatment were associated with CAM use, but the levels of education were not associated.

Conclusion: CAM users were mainly middle-aged females; their high levels of education did not lower the CAM adoption rates. Their choices could have been driven by cultural beliefs and boundaries embedded in the community.

Speaker
Biography:

Chung-Ching Chu has graduated from National Taiwan University with a BS in Life Science. She has obtained her MS degree in Immunology from Imperial College, London and then proceeded to complete her PhD in Immunology from St. John’s Institute of Dermatology, King’s College London. She has over 10 years’ experience in human immunology research and has published in journals such as Blood, Seminars in Immunology and Journal of Experimental Medicine. She is presently a Senior Research Manager in Unilever R&D Shanghai, working to advance the science of skin biology and the efficacy of personal care products.

 

Abstract:

Acne is a multifactorial skin condition that has long been associated with changes in bacteria colonization. Cutaneous lipids, including certain free fatty acids derived from human sebaceous triglycerides and free long-chain sphingoid bases released from stratum corneum ceramides are potent and broad-acting antimicrobials contributing to skin’s self-disinfecting property and host innate defense. Dysregulated expression of skin’s antimicrobial lipids has been reported in acne condition and may be implicated in microbial dysbiosis. Here we report that long-chain sphingoid bases including C18 sphingosine, C18 phytosphingosine and C18 sphinganine, as well as sapienic acids (C16:1D6), the dominant sebaceous antimicrobial fatty acids, displayed potent antimicrobial efficacy against Propionibacterium acnes. Combination of cutaneous antimicrobial lipids with the plant derived monoterpenes of thymol and terpineol demonstrated a synergistic anti-P. acnes efficacy. Both the C18 sphingoid bases and sapienic acids perturbed the integrity of microbial cell membrane; a mechanism of action resembles that of thymol and terpineol. In contrast, no direct antimicrobial synergy was observed between cutaneous antimicrobial lipids and the skin-acting acne control agents such as salicylic acids and 6-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-naphthoic acid. Our results demonstrated a potential synergistic antimicrobial benefit of thymol and terpineol with skin surface lipids to manage P. acnes and thereby aid in acne control.

Speaker
Biography:

Tatiana Pecova has completed her PhD in Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University in Slovakia, where she works as a Resident and part-time Assistant Lecturer. She has published 23 papers, including international and current content magazines and was awarded with two honorary scholarships (PSO-2016 and EADV-2017 Michael Hornstein Memorial Scholarship). Her current research focuses on biologic treatment of psoriasis and STIs.

Abstract:

Anti-TNF-alpha treatment is indicated for the moderate to severe chronic plaque psoriasis. Apart from its therapeutical benefits, there are adverse effects to be considered, mainly infectious complications. TNF-alpha cytokine plays important role in formation and maintenance of granuloma; therefore, its inhibitors pose a risk for granulomatous infections and reactivation of latent tuberculosis. The author analyzed the group of 190 patients from Slovakia treated with TNF inhibitors as compared to other biologics. To assess the latent form of tuberculosis, IGRA (interferon-gamma release assay) test was performed before biologic treatment and once a year after it is beginning-according to guidelines and TBNET consensus. 3% of patients had permanently positive IGRA test and in 28% of patients treated by TNF inhibitors, conversion of IGRA test appeared with negative test before treatment and positive test after administration of biologics. No active tuberculosis was detected. The average time of IGRA conversion was 3 years after beginning of treatment. The only statistically significant predictor was age and increase in one year was associated with 5.8% increase of risk of IGRA conversion. Regarding other infectious complications, the most common infections in patients treated with biologics were respiratory and HPV infections.

  • Cosmetic Dermatology
Location: Osaka, Japan
Biography:

Dr Tingsong Lim has actively involved in many academic research and training in Asian facial and body aesthetics, clinical application of fillers’ rheology, facial overfilled syndrome, pigmentary disorders, laser medicine and regenerative medicine. Graduated from Tohoku University School of Medicine under the Monbusho Scholarship, Dr Lim speaks 4 languages (English, Mandarin, Malay, Japanese) fluently, and has been a frequent speaker and trainer regionally and internationally. Medical Director of Clique Clinic, Dr Lim has a private practice in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Abstract:

As hyaluronic acid fillers is widely available in the market, the trend to flood the face with large volume of fillers became a common practice in the industry. However, such practice is not only impractical and not cost-effective, it can be also very dangerous, as it could lead to higher chances of vascular complications and facial overfilled syndromes. This masterclass reveals the science and art of injectology, exploring the many rheologies of fillers, and how to make use of such knowledge to deliver a more cost-effective and safer injection techniques