Call for Abstract

7th European Dermatology Congress, will be organized around the theme “New Horizons in Dermatology”

Dermatology Congress 2016 is comprised of 12 tracks and 98 sessions designed to offer comprehensive sessions that address current issues in Dermatology Congress 2016.

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks. All related abstracts are accepted.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

Skin cancers are cancers that arise from the skin. They are due to the development of abnormal cells that have the ability to invade or spread to other parts of the body. There are three main types: basal-cell cancer (BCC), squamous-cell cancer (SCC) and melanoma. The first two together along with a number of less common skin cancers are known as nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Basal-cell cancer grows slowly and can damage the tissue around it but is unlikely to spread to distant areas or result in death. It often appears as a painless raised area of skin, that may be shiny with small blood vessel running over it or may present as a raised area with an ulcer. Squamous-cell cancer is more likely to spread. It usually presents as a hard lump with a scaly top but may also form an ulcer. Melanomas are the most aggressive. Signs include a mole that has changed in size, shape, color, has irregular edges, has more than one color, is itchy or bleeds. 

Each year in the US, over 5.4 million cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer are treated in more than 3.3 million people. Treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancers increased by nearly 77 per cent between 1992 and 2006. Over the past three decades, more people have had skin cancer than all other cancers combined.

  • Track 1-1Advances in Skin Cancer Treatment Methods
  • Track 1-2Advances in Skin Cancer Diagnostic Procedures
  • Track 1-3Advances in Skin Cancer Research
  • Track 1-4Melanoma
  • Track 1-5Benign Skin Tumors
  • Track 1-6Premalignant and Malignant Nonmelanoma skin tumors
  • Track 1-7Vascular Tumors and Malformations
  • Track 1-8Nevi and Malignant Melanoma
  • Track 1-9MicroRNA in skin cancer

Psoriasis is a long-lasting autoimmune disease characterized by patches of abnormal skin. These skin patches are typically red, itchy, and scaly. They may vary in severity from small and localized to complete body coverage. Injury to the skin can trigger psoriatic skin changes at that spot, which is known as Koebner phenomenon. Psoriasis is generally thought to be a genetic disease which is triggered by environmental factors.  Symptoms often worsen during winter and with certain medications such as beta blockers or NSAIDs. Infections and psychological stress may also play a role. Psoriasis is not contagious. The underlying mechanism involves the immune system reacting to skin cells. Diagnosis is typically based on the signs and symptoms.

According to the International Federation of Psoriasis Associations (IFPA), about three per cent of the world’s population has some form of psoriasis. In the United States, there are about 150,000 new cases every year, affecting about two per cent of the population, according to the Cleveland Clinic.

 

  • Track 2-1Advances in Psoriasis Treatment
  • Track 2-2Psoriasis Arthritis
  • Track 2-3Pustular Psoriasis
  • Track 2-4Papulosquamous Diseases
  • Track 2-5Advances in Psoriasis Research
  • Track 2-6Skin immune mechanism in psoriasis
  • Track 2-7Genetics of psoriasis

Dermatology is the branch of medicine dealing with the hair, nails, skin and its diseases. It is a specialty with both medical and surgical aspects. A dermatologist treats diseases, in the widest sense, and some cosmetic problems of the skin includes Acne is a long-term skin condition characterized by areas of blackheads, whiteheads, pimples, greasy skin, and possibly scarring. Skin cancer and malignancy of epithelial cells, Contact dermatitis, Kawasaki syndrome, Inflammation, scars and rashes, Viral skin diseases. 

The percentage of consultations relating to cutaneous disorders varied between practices, ranging from 3% to 18.8%, with a mean of 8.4%. Eczema accounted for 22.5%, infections 20.3% and benign tumours for 11.4% of consultations with a dermatological basis. In contrast, in secondary care, benign tumours accounted for 23.8%, malignant tumours for 16.4% and eczema for 16.3% of dermatological consultations.

 

  • Track 3-1Onychomycosis and other Nail Diseases
  • Track 3-2Photodermatoses
  • Track 3-3Neuropsychocutaneous Disorders
  • Track 3-4Melanocytic Lesions
  • Track 3-5Skin diseases of Pregnancy
  • Track 3-6Disorders of Melanin Pigmentation
  • Track 3-7Anaphylaxis
  • Track 3-8Hives (Urticaria)
  • Track 3-9Dermatitis
  • Track 3-10Hair Diseases
  • Track 3-11Allergic contact dermatitis
  • Track 3-12Ichthyosis Vulgaris
  • Track 3-13Acne
  • Track 3-14Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Track 3-15Epidermolysis bullosa
  • Track 3-16Rosasea
  • Track 3-17Angioedema
  • Track 3-18Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Diseases

Dermatologic surgery deals with the diagnosis and treatment of medically necessary and cosmetic conditions of the skin, hair, nails, veins, mucous membranes and adjacent tissues by various surgical, reconstructive, cosmetic and non-surgical methods. The purpose of dermatologic surgery is to repair and/or improve the function and cosmetic appearance of skin tissue. Examples of dermatologic surgery procedures include anti-aging treatments, injectable and implantable soft tissue fillers, botulinum toxin treatments, correction of acne scarring, chemical peeling, tumescent liposuction, vein therapy, hair restoration, laser surgery, skin cancer treatment and reconstructive flaps and grafts.

Compared to 2013, the overall demand for cosmetic procedures increased 3% in 2014, with surgical procedures increasing 1% and non-surgical procedures increasing 4%. Buttock enhancement procedures saw significant gains in 2014, with buttock augmentation via fat transfer increasing 15% and buttock implants increasing 98% compared to 2013. The number of men seeking plastic surgery continues to rise. 2014 saw a 208% increase in the use of pectoral implants and a 29% increase in gynecomastia surgery.

 

  • Track 4-1Laser/light Therapy
  • Track 4-2Cryosurgery
  • Track 4-3Cryolipolysis
  • Track 4-4Microlipoinjection
  • Track 4-5Micropigmentation
  • Track 4-6Laser Resurfacing
  • Track 4-7Hair Transplants
  • Track 4-8Dermal Fillers
  • Track 4-9Chemical Peels
  • Track 4-10Liposuction
  • Track 4-11Neuromodulators

Cosmetic dermatology is a subfield of dermatology that serves individuals with aesthetic concerns. Cosmetic dermatologists provide medical and surgical treatments to people with problems such as bacterial or fungal infections, aging, acne, allergic reactions, unwanted hair, benign skin growths, and uneven skin pigmentation. They need to have completed medical or osteopathy school, hold a medical license to practice, and have completed at least four years of additional training. Many also become board certified as dermatologists. 

There were more than 9 million cosmetic procedures performed in the US in 2011. An increase of nearly 1% in the total number of cosmetic procedures was observed between 2010 and 2011. There were 1.6 million procedures performed from 2010 to 2011. Liposuction rates increased almost 13% between 2010 and 2011, with more than 300,000 procedures performed.

  • Track 5-1Sclerotherapy (Leg Veins)
  • Track 5-2Treatment of fine lines and wrinkles with Fillers
  • Track 5-3Pigmented Lesions Lasers
  • Track 5-4Vascular Laser
  • Track 5-5Fractional Laser
  • Track 5-6Laser Hair Removal
  • Track 5-7Anti-aging treatments

A pediatric dermatologist is a dermatologist who specializes in diagnosing and treating children, including newborns and infants. This medical doctor first becomes a dermatologist. Extra study and training are needed to become a pediatric dermatologist. Some diseases that affect the skin, hair, or nails are more common in children. Some of these diseases only occur in children. Diseases that a pediatric dermatologist is likely to treat include: Atopic dermatitis (also called eczema), Birthmarks (including port-wine stains), Psoriasis, Skin disease that a child is born with, Skin infections, Vitiligo, Warts. 

A total of 10,000 consecutive new patients were studied; 96% were children of Arab descent. A female preponderance (52%) was observed, and infants constituted the largest group within the patient population (28.7%). A total of 162 dermatoses were recorded. Atopic dermatitis was the most prevalent dermatosis (31.3%), followed by viral warts (13.1%), alopecia areata (6.7%), pityriasis alba (5.25%), psoriasis (4%), and diaper dermatitis (4%). Atopic dermatitis was the most frequently seen dermatosis in children of all age groups, whereas, viral warts were more prevalent in school-age children.

 

  • Track 6-1Acne
  • Track 6-2Alopecia (hair loss)
  • Track 6-3Disorders of the hair and nails
  • Track 6-4Eczema
  • Track 6-5Hemangiomas
  • Track 6-6Vitiligo and pigmentation disorders

Clinical immunology is the study of diseases caused by disorders of the immune system (failure, aberrant action, and malignant growth of the cellular elements of the system). It also involves diseases of other systems, where immune reactions play a part in the pathology and clinical features.

The diseases caused by disorders of the immune system fall into two broad categories:

  • Immunodeficiency, in which parts of the immune system fail to provide an adequate response (examples include chronic granulomatous disease and primary immune diseases);
  • Autoimmunity, in which the immune system attacks its own host's body (examples include systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Hashimoto's disease and myasthenia gravis).

 

  • Track 7-1Auto immunity
  • Track 7-2Primary Immunodeficiency
  • Track 7-3Vaccines
  • Track 7-4Tumor Immunology
  • Track 7-5Allergy
  • Track 7-6Photo immunology

Humans are natural hosts for many bacterial species that colonize the skin as normal flora. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes are infrequent resident flora, but they account for a wide variety of bacterial pyodermas. Predisposing factors to infection include minor trauma, preexisting skin disease, poor hygiene, and, rarely, impaired host immunity.

  • Impetigo
  • Folliculitis, Furunculosis, and Carbunculosis
  • Ecthyma
  • Erysipelas abd Cellulitis
  • Necrotising Fascitis
  • Boils
  • Pilonidal Cyst and Abscess

The percentage of consultations relating to cutaneous disorders varied between practices, ranging from 3% to 18.8%, with a mean of 8.4%. Eczema accounted for 22.5%, infections 20.3% and benign tumours for 11.4% of consultations with a dermatological basis. In contrast, in secondary care, benign tumours accounted for 23.8%, malignant tumours for 16.4% and eczema for 16.3% of dermatological consultations.

  • Track 8-1Leprosy
  • Track 8-2Cellulitis
  • Track 8-3Impetigo
  • Track 8-4Boils
  • Track 8-5Pilonidal abscess
  • Track 8-6Hidradenitis Suppurativa
  • Track 8-7Leishmaniasis

There are many viral skin infections. They range from the common to the rare, from the mild to the severe and from those causing just skin infection to those with associated systemic disease.

  • Herpes Simplex
  • Herpes Zoster (Shingles)
  • Warts
  • Molluscum Contagiosum
  • Chickenpox

The percentage of consultations relating to cutaneous disorders varied between practices, ranging from 3% to 18.8%, with a mean of 8.4%. Eczema accounted for 22.5%, infections 20.3% and benign tumours for 11.4% of consultations with a dermatological basis. In contrast, in secondary care, benign tumours accounted for 23.8%, malignant tumours for 16.4% and eczema for 16.3% of dermatological consultations.

  • Track 9-1Molluscum Contagiosum
  • Track 9-2Shingles
  • Track 9-3Chickenpox
  • Track 9-4Cold sores
  • Track 9-5Kawasaki disease
  • Track 9-6Erythema infectiosum
  • Track 9-7Plantar warts
  • Track 9-8Verruca Plana

Fungal skin infections are caused by different types of fungi, including dermatophytes and yeasts.Fungi invade and grow in dead keratin. Keratin is a protein that makes up your skin, hair and nails. There are several different types of fungal infections. They are divided into different groups depending on what type of fungus is involved. 

Types of fungal skin infections:

Dermatophyte infections, Yeast infections

The percentage of consultations relating to cutaneous disorders varied between practices, ranging from 3% to 18.8%, with a mean of 8.4%. Eczema accounted for 22.5%, infections 20.3% and benign tumours for 11.4% of consultations with a dermatological basis. In contrast, in secondary care, benign tumours accounted for 23.8%, malignant tumours for 16.4% and eczema for 16.3% of dermatological consultations.

  • Track 10-1Tinea versicolor
  • Track 10-2Thrush (yeast infection)
  • Track 10-3Candidiasis (Moniliasis)
  • Track 10-4Sporotrichosis
  • Track 10-5Tinea pedia
  • Track 10-6Tinea cruris (jock itch)
  • Track 10-7Ringworm on the hands (tinea manus)
  • Track 10-8Ringworm on the feet (tinea pedis)
  • Track 10-9Ringworm Tinea Corporis (Faciei)
  • Track 10-10Ringworm of the scalp (Tinea capitis)
  • Track 10-11Histoplasmosis

The research in Dermatology reaches many subspecialty areas, and includes collaborations with other departments. Conducting both basic science research, and clinical and translational research and exploring new ways to diagnose disease, design therapies and deliver treatment. Areas of clinical research currently include:

  • Aesthetic Research
  • Ethnic Skin Research
  • Melanoma Research
  • Pediatric Research
  • Wound Research
  • Skin Regeneration Research

Compared to 2013, the overall demand for cosmetic procedures increased 3% in 2014, with surgical procedures increasing 1% and non-surgical procedures increasing 4%. Buttock enhancement procedures saw significant gains in 2014, with buttock augmentation via fat transfer increasing 15% and buttock implants increasing 98% compared to 2013. The number of men seeking plastic surgery continues to rise. 2014 saw a 208% increase in the use of pectoral implants and a 29% increase in gynecomastia surgery.

  • Track 11-1Skin cell regeneration
  • Track 11-2Wound healing
  • Track 11-3Gene therapy
  • Track 11-4Cutaneous aging
  • Track 11-5Cell proliferation and differentiation
  • Track 11-6Autoimmune disorders and blistering diseases
  • Track 11-7Ethnic Skin Research
  • Track 11-8Aesthetic Research

Entrepreneur Investment meet is helpful to companies to raise funds with trusted and smart investors in National and international markets.  The objective of the meet is to get the investors and willing to go through due diligence process to understand if they want to invest. In addition to capital, entrepreneurs need a favourable environment to launch and develop their dynamic businesses. This environment, commonly called an "entrepreneurial ecosystem". Dermatological entrepreneurship meeting depends on the reimbursement strategies, business model innovation, innovation in dermatology, financing early stage assets, including friends and family, angel investors, and non-dilutive funding sources, translational research, regulatory affairs and poster business competitions.